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Article: Validity of cephalometric landmarks. An experimental study on human skulls

TitleValidity of cephalometric landmarks. An experimental study on human skulls
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
European Journal Of Orthodontics, 1994, v. 16 n. 2, p. 110-120 How to Cite?
AbstractCephalometric landmark validity (the difference between the estimated landmark and the true landmark) has surprisingly not previously been comprehensively evaluated, and no previous study has examined the validity of cephalometric angles and distances. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of 15 commonly used skeletal and dental cephalometric landmarks, and the subsequent effects on 17 angles and distances.Small steel balls were glued on to 30 Chinese dry skulls to represent the true anatomical landmarks. The skulls were mounted in a purpose-designed skull holder and two cephalo-grams recorded of each skull, one with and one without the steel balls on the landmarks. Validity was expressed as the difference in the measurements between the assessments made with and without the steel ball markers. Measurements were made relative to Xand Yco-ordinates which were constructed from reference points (steel balls) glued intracranially to the skulls.Seven out of the 10 skeletal landmarks and all five dental landmarks, were found to be non-valid along the X or the Yaxes (P<0.05). The standard deviations of the validity errors were large, being 1.0-2.5 mm, along at least one axis, for eight of the skeletal landmarks and three of the dental landmarks.Four of the cephalometric angles (SNA, SN/MnP, MxP/MnP, and LI/MnP) and three of the distances (N-Me, MxP-Me, and lower incisor edge to APg) were also found to be invalid (P<0.05). The validity errors were greater for angles involving dental landmarks and for angles dependent on four landmarks compared to those dependent on three. The standard deviations of the validity errors for the skeletal angles ranged from 0.9 to 1.8 degrees, except for ANB (0.4 degrees), and for the dental angles from 3.2 to 5.8 degrees. © 1994 European Orthodontic Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153876
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.090

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTng, TTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, TCKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHägg, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorCooke, MSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:22:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:22:03Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Orthodontics, 1994, v. 16 n. 2, p. 110-120en_US
dc.identifier.issn0141-5387en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153876-
dc.description.abstractCephalometric landmark validity (the difference between the estimated landmark and the true landmark) has surprisingly not previously been comprehensively evaluated, and no previous study has examined the validity of cephalometric angles and distances. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of 15 commonly used skeletal and dental cephalometric landmarks, and the subsequent effects on 17 angles and distances.Small steel balls were glued on to 30 Chinese dry skulls to represent the true anatomical landmarks. The skulls were mounted in a purpose-designed skull holder and two cephalo-grams recorded of each skull, one with and one without the steel balls on the landmarks. Validity was expressed as the difference in the measurements between the assessments made with and without the steel ball markers. Measurements were made relative to Xand Yco-ordinates which were constructed from reference points (steel balls) glued intracranially to the skulls.Seven out of the 10 skeletal landmarks and all five dental landmarks, were found to be non-valid along the X or the Yaxes (P<0.05). The standard deviations of the validity errors were large, being 1.0-2.5 mm, along at least one axis, for eight of the skeletal landmarks and three of the dental landmarks.Four of the cephalometric angles (SNA, SN/MnP, MxP/MnP, and LI/MnP) and three of the distances (N-Me, MxP-Me, and lower incisor edge to APg) were also found to be invalid (P<0.05). The validity errors were greater for angles involving dental landmarks and for angles dependent on four landmarks compared to those dependent on three. The standard deviations of the validity errors for the skeletal angles ranged from 0.9 to 1.8 degrees, except for ANB (0.4 degrees), and for the dental angles from 3.2 to 5.8 degrees. © 1994 European Orthodontic Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Orthodonticsen_US
dc.rightsEuropean Journal of Orthodontics. Copyright © Oxford University Press.-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCephalometry - methods - standards-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshSkull - anatomy and histology - radiography-
dc.titleValidity of cephalometric landmarks. An experimental study on human skullsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHägg, U:euohagg@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHägg, U=rp00020en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ejo/16.2.110en_US
dc.identifier.pmid8005198-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028411814en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros5134-
dc.identifier.volume16en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage110en_US
dc.identifier.epage120en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTng, TTH=6507663848en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TCK=7402687561en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHägg, U=7006790279en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCooke, MS=7202147454en_US

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