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Article: In vitro cleaning ability of root canal irrigants with and without endosonics

TitleIn vitro cleaning ability of root canal irrigants with and without endosonics
Authors
Issue Date1993
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/IEJ
Citation
International Endodontic Journal, 1993, v. 26 n. 6, p. 334-343 How to Cite?
AbstractA variety of methods have been used to evaluate the cleanliness of root canals after endodontic preparation and irrigation. Few irrigation agents other than sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) have been tested in conjunction with endosonics. The purpose of this study was to examine the cleaning ability of water, NaOCl, Hibiscrub and a biological washing liquid when used as intracanal irrigants, with and without endosonics. Two methods of evaluation were employed to assess the root canal cleanliness after endodontic preparation. A total of 56 teeth, divided into eight groups, were prepared manually using the step-down technique. Each irrigating agent was used in two experimental groups, with and without endosonics. Two additional teeth which received neither instrumentation nor irrigation served as the controls. The teeth were split longitudinally and the state of cleanliness of the root canal was assessed by scoring the amount of stained organic debris and smear layer. It was demonstrated that the results of debris and smear layer scoring were significantly influenced by the type of irrigant and whether endosonics had been used. All agents exhibited similar cleaning ability when introduced manually. With endosonics, NaOCl yielded significantly less stainable debris (P < 0.05) than the other groups which showed no significant difference. The ability to remove the smear layer was enhanced, but at some distance short of the working length, by endosonics for all irrigants tested. None of the solutions tested was able to produce a canal wall that was free of smear layer.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153839
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.842
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.020
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, GSen_US
dc.contributor.authorStock, CJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:21:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:21:51Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Endodontic Journal, 1993, v. 26 n. 6, p. 334-343en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-2885en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153839-
dc.description.abstractA variety of methods have been used to evaluate the cleanliness of root canals after endodontic preparation and irrigation. Few irrigation agents other than sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) have been tested in conjunction with endosonics. The purpose of this study was to examine the cleaning ability of water, NaOCl, Hibiscrub and a biological washing liquid when used as intracanal irrigants, with and without endosonics. Two methods of evaluation were employed to assess the root canal cleanliness after endodontic preparation. A total of 56 teeth, divided into eight groups, were prepared manually using the step-down technique. Each irrigating agent was used in two experimental groups, with and without endosonics. Two additional teeth which received neither instrumentation nor irrigation served as the controls. The teeth were split longitudinally and the state of cleanliness of the root canal was assessed by scoring the amount of stained organic debris and smear layer. It was demonstrated that the results of debris and smear layer scoring were significantly influenced by the type of irrigant and whether endosonics had been used. All agents exhibited similar cleaning ability when introduced manually. With endosonics, NaOCl yielded significantly less stainable debris (P < 0.05) than the other groups which showed no significant difference. The ability to remove the smear layer was enhanced, but at some distance short of the working length, by endosonics for all irrigants tested. None of the solutions tested was able to produce a canal wall that was free of smear layer.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/IEJen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational endodontic journalen_US
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshChlorhexidine - Analogs & Derivativesen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Cavity Preparation - Instrumentation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshDrug Combinationsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLipidsen_US
dc.subject.meshObserver Variationen_US
dc.subject.meshPeptide Hydrolasesen_US
dc.subject.meshPolyphosphatesen_US
dc.subject.meshRoot Canal Irrigantsen_US
dc.subject.meshRoot Canal Therapy - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshSmear Layeren_US
dc.subject.meshSodium Hypochloriteen_US
dc.subject.meshSurface-Active Agentsen_US
dc.subject.meshUltrasonic Therapy - Instrumentationen_US
dc.titleIn vitro cleaning ability of root canal irrigants with and without endosonicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, GS:spcheung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, GS=rp00016en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2591.1993.tb00766.x-
dc.identifier.pmid8144242-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027690680en_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage334en_US
dc.identifier.epage343en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993MH29100002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, GS=7005809531en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStock, CJ=7102473677en_US

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