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Article: Progression of periodontal disease in patients with mild to moderate adult periodontitis.

TitleProgression of periodontal disease in patients with mild to moderate adult periodontitis.
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1992, v. 19 n. 9 Pt 1, p. 659-666 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of the present study was to determine the progression rate of periodontal disease in patients treated for localized or generalized mild to moderate adult periodontitis. 52 patients with a mean age of 53.7 years (S.D. 12.6 years) were instructed in optimal home care procedures and exposed to initial periodontal therapy, before reconstructive therapy was initiated. Following completion of the prosthetic procedures, supportive therapy was offered to a limited extent and maintenance visits were irregularly scheduled corresponding to traditional dental care. Clinical periodontal parameters from 4 sites per tooth were assessed at the initial examination, at the time of reevaluation after initial therapy and at the re-examination after 8-years. Full sets of intraoral radiographs from the initial and the 8-year re-examination were analyzed with respect to changes in the radiographic alveolar bone height as a % of the total tooth length. As the result of the home care instructions, the mean plaque index (plaque control record) amounted to 21% at the end of initial periodontal therapy. 8 years later, the re-examination revealed a mean plaque index of 49% and a mean gingival bleeding index of 24%. At the initial examination, the 52 patients presented with an average of 18.7 teeth. During treatment, 26 teeth were sacrificed and 19 teeth were lost over the 8 years of supportive therapy. Bicuspids were the most frequent teeth to be lost over the observation period. As a result of initial therapy, the mean pocket probing depths decreased significantly. However, after 8 years, only minor differences were found when compared to the initial examination.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153800
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBrägger, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorHåkanson, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:21:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:21:39Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1992, v. 19 n. 9 Pt 1, p. 659-666en_US
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153800-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the present study was to determine the progression rate of periodontal disease in patients treated for localized or generalized mild to moderate adult periodontitis. 52 patients with a mean age of 53.7 years (S.D. 12.6 years) were instructed in optimal home care procedures and exposed to initial periodontal therapy, before reconstructive therapy was initiated. Following completion of the prosthetic procedures, supportive therapy was offered to a limited extent and maintenance visits were irregularly scheduled corresponding to traditional dental care. Clinical periodontal parameters from 4 sites per tooth were assessed at the initial examination, at the time of reevaluation after initial therapy and at the re-examination after 8-years. Full sets of intraoral radiographs from the initial and the 8-year re-examination were analyzed with respect to changes in the radiographic alveolar bone height as a % of the total tooth length. As the result of the home care instructions, the mean plaque index (plaque control record) amounted to 21% at the end of initial periodontal therapy. 8 years later, the re-examination revealed a mean plaque index of 49% and a mean gingival bleeding index of 24%. At the initial examination, the 52 patients presented with an average of 18.7 teeth. During treatment, 26 teeth were sacrificed and 19 teeth were lost over the 8 years of supportive therapy. Bicuspids were the most frequent teeth to be lost over the observation period. As a result of initial therapy, the mean pocket probing depths decreased significantly. However, after 8 years, only minor differences were found when compared to the initial examination.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshAlveolar Bone Loss - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAppointments And Schedulesen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - Pathology - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshGingiva - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGingival Hemorrhage - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOral Hygieneen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Pocket - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - Pathology - Physiopathology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth Loss - Pathologyen_US
dc.titleProgression of periodontal disease in patients with mild to moderate adult periodontitis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1430294-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026933456en_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue9 Pt 1en_US
dc.identifier.spage659en_US
dc.identifier.epage666en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992JT98800009-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrägger, U=7005538598en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHåkanson, D=6603013421en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

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