File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Black-pigmenting gram-negative bacteria in periodontal disease. II. Screening strategies for detection of P. gingivalis.

TitleBlack-pigmenting gram-negative bacteria in periodontal disease. II. Screening strategies for detection of P. gingivalis.
Authors
Issue Date1991
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3484&site=1
Citation
Journal Of Periodontal Research, 1991, v. 26 n. 4, p. 308-313 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the feasibility of detecting P. gingivalis using selected sites and to indicate increased proportions of this organism in periodontitis patients. In 10 patients suffering from moderate to advanced periodontal disease, separate microbiological samples were taken from the mesial, buccal, distal and oral (lingual or palatal) aspects of every tooth. This yielded a total of 927 microbiological samples, 84 to 102 per patient. Three distinct patterns of distribution and relative proportion of P. gingivalis were recognized. In one group of patients, the organism was not cultured. In a second group, few positive sites with low proportions of P. gingivalis were present. A third group of patients yielded high frequencies and proportions of P. gingivalis. The number of samples necessary to diagnose the presence of P. gingivalis at a 95% confidence level varied considerably between the three groups. In 4 patients, sampling 4 randomly selected sites was sufficient, while in the remaining 3 positive patients, 25 or more samples were required to detect the organism with equal certainty. Seven different protocols for multiple subgingival sampling were studied. When considering the number of samples needed to detect the presence of P. gingivalis and to estimate the highest proportion of this organism, selection of the deepest pocket in each quadrant was the most efficient method of sampling.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153759
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.474
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.932
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMombelli, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcnabb, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:21:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:21:25Z-
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Periodontal Research, 1991, v. 26 n. 4, p. 308-313en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-3484en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153759-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the feasibility of detecting P. gingivalis using selected sites and to indicate increased proportions of this organism in periodontitis patients. In 10 patients suffering from moderate to advanced periodontal disease, separate microbiological samples were taken from the mesial, buccal, distal and oral (lingual or palatal) aspects of every tooth. This yielded a total of 927 microbiological samples, 84 to 102 per patient. Three distinct patterns of distribution and relative proportion of P. gingivalis were recognized. In one group of patients, the organism was not cultured. In a second group, few positive sites with low proportions of P. gingivalis were present. A third group of patients yielded high frequencies and proportions of P. gingivalis. The number of samples necessary to diagnose the presence of P. gingivalis at a 95% confidence level varied considerably between the three groups. In 4 patients, sampling 4 randomly selected sites was sufficient, while in the remaining 3 positive patients, 25 or more samples were required to detect the organism with equal certainty. Seven different protocols for multiple subgingival sampling were studied. When considering the number of samples needed to detect the presence of P. gingivalis and to estimate the highest proportion of this organism, selection of the deepest pocket in each quadrant was the most efficient method of sampling.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0022-3484&site=1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Periodontal Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBacteriological Techniquesen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteroides - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshColony Count, Microbialen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Diseases - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Pocket - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProbabilityen_US
dc.subject.meshSampling Studiesen_US
dc.titleBlack-pigmenting gram-negative bacteria in periodontal disease. II. Screening strategies for detection of P. gingivalis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1831498-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026195776en_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage308en_US
dc.identifier.epage313en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1991FY18000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMombelli, A=7006180872en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcNabb, H=6603160993en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats