File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: In vivo early human dental plaque formation on different supporting substances. A scanning electron microscopic and bacteriological study.

TitleIn vivo early human dental plaque formation on different supporting substances. A scanning electron microscopic and bacteriological study.
Authors
Issue Date1991
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLR
Citation
Clinical Oral Implants Research, 1991, v. 2 n. 1, p. 38-46 How to Cite?
AbstractDifferent studies have shown that various substances may have an influence on early human dental plaque formation. The purpose of the present study was to compare on tooth substances and supporting prosthetic materials the amount of plaque deposition by SEM and the quantity of selected bacteria using anaerobic culturing techniques. 5 bridges, replacing a missing molar or premolar, were incorporated in 3 patients. In the midbuccal area of each pontic, a semi-precision attachment was placed allowing the insertion of the following test facings: enamel, dentine, non gamma 2-amalgam, alloys of 85% and 55% gold, silver-palladium, chrome-cobalt, chrome-cobalt-titanium, and ceramic. For each material, 2 facings were fabricated. After 4 and 24 hours in situ, bacteriological samples were taken and processed for further identification. After a 2nd period of 4 and 24 hours in situ, the same facings were carefully removed and prepared for SEM-examination. All 4-hour specimens exhibited various areas covered by plaque, the amount of which varied with the different supporting substances. The very smooth surfaces (e.g., gold) harbored sparse deposits, while the rougher (e.g., amalgam) were covered by more plaque. After 24 hours of plaque development, an increase in the number of micro-organisms was noted for all the specimens. After 4 and 24 hours of plaque accumulation, no specific trends suggesting a preferential colonization on the different substances were observed. This study has shown that the amount of early deposits on different substances seems to be related to the degree of their surface roughness, while plaque formation was qualitatively similar.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153733
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.464
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.427
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSiegrist, BEen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrecx, MCen_US
dc.contributor.authorGusberti, FAen_US
dc.contributor.authorJoss, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:21:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:21:17Z-
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Implants Research, 1991, v. 2 n. 1, p. 38-46en_US
dc.identifier.issn0905-7161en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153733-
dc.description.abstractDifferent studies have shown that various substances may have an influence on early human dental plaque formation. The purpose of the present study was to compare on tooth substances and supporting prosthetic materials the amount of plaque deposition by SEM and the quantity of selected bacteria using anaerobic culturing techniques. 5 bridges, replacing a missing molar or premolar, were incorporated in 3 patients. In the midbuccal area of each pontic, a semi-precision attachment was placed allowing the insertion of the following test facings: enamel, dentine, non gamma 2-amalgam, alloys of 85% and 55% gold, silver-palladium, chrome-cobalt, chrome-cobalt-titanium, and ceramic. For each material, 2 facings were fabricated. After 4 and 24 hours in situ, bacteriological samples were taken and processed for further identification. After a 2nd period of 4 and 24 hours in situ, the same facings were carefully removed and prepared for SEM-examination. All 4-hour specimens exhibited various areas covered by plaque, the amount of which varied with the different supporting substances. The very smooth surfaces (e.g., gold) harbored sparse deposits, while the rougher (e.g., amalgam) were covered by more plaque. After 24 hours of plaque development, an increase in the number of micro-organisms was noted for all the specimens. After 4 and 24 hours of plaque accumulation, no specific trends suggesting a preferential colonization on the different substances were observed. This study has shown that the amount of early deposits on different substances seems to be related to the degree of their surface roughness, while plaque formation was qualitatively similar.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CLRen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical oral implants researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBacterial Adhesionen_US
dc.subject.meshCeramicsen_US
dc.subject.meshColony Count, Microbialen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Alloysen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Enamel - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Materialsen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDentin - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanningen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_US
dc.titleIn vivo early human dental plaque formation on different supporting substances. A scanning electron microscopic and bacteriological study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1807421-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025718091en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage38en_US
dc.identifier.epage46en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000207639300005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSiegrist, BE=6603066820en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrecx, MC=7006631249en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGusberti, FA=6604050465en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJoss, A=7005904584en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats