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Article: Epidemiology of periodontal disease

TitleEpidemiology of periodontal disease
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archoralbio
Citation
Archives Of Oral Biology, 1990, v. 35 SUPPL. 1, p. S9-S14 How to Cite?
AbstractThe epidemiological studies of the 50s and 60s have used visual diagnosis for gathering data to describe prevalence and severity of periodontal diseases within a population. Well-defined index systems were developed and loss of connective tissue attachment from a fixed landmark was established. More recently, the CPITN which had been designed to examine treatment needs in populations was also used erroneously to assess information about prevalence and severity. While data gathered on the basis of the CPITN are rather inconclusive, all the recent epidemiological surveys which used the full spectrum of clinical measurements yielded a rather low proportion of the population of industrialized countries affected by severe periodontal disease. Apparently, quite a large proportion of most populations show signs of gingivitis, but little loss of connective tissue attachment. Only a low percentage is at risk from periodontal disease progression and hence, would need advanced periodontal therapy. While epidemiological surveys used to determine signs and symptoms of inflammation and hence, treatment goals had been defined towards eliminating these symptoms, more recent decision making models for treatment planning have redefined treatment goals: the maintenance of all natural teeth in the dentition in a state of function throughout life. These proposed models are the first attempts to identify subjects at high risk from periodontal disease progression using conventional, but standardized radiography and hereby supplementing clinical data. One of these models is discussed in detail.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153730
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.733
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.713
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:21:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:21:16Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Oral Biology, 1990, v. 35 SUPPL. 1, p. S9-S14en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-9969en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153730-
dc.description.abstractThe epidemiological studies of the 50s and 60s have used visual diagnosis for gathering data to describe prevalence and severity of periodontal diseases within a population. Well-defined index systems were developed and loss of connective tissue attachment from a fixed landmark was established. More recently, the CPITN which had been designed to examine treatment needs in populations was also used erroneously to assess information about prevalence and severity. While data gathered on the basis of the CPITN are rather inconclusive, all the recent epidemiological surveys which used the full spectrum of clinical measurements yielded a rather low proportion of the population of industrialized countries affected by severe periodontal disease. Apparently, quite a large proportion of most populations show signs of gingivitis, but little loss of connective tissue attachment. Only a low percentage is at risk from periodontal disease progression and hence, would need advanced periodontal therapy. While epidemiological surveys used to determine signs and symptoms of inflammation and hence, treatment goals had been defined towards eliminating these symptoms, more recent decision making models for treatment planning have redefined treatment goals: the maintenance of all natural teeth in the dentition in a state of function throughout life. These proposed models are the first attempts to identify subjects at high risk from periodontal disease progression using conventional, but standardized radiography and hereby supplementing clinical data. One of these models is discussed in detail.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archoralbioen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Oral Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Needs And Demanden_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Diseases - Epidemiology - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Indexen_US
dc.titleEpidemiology of periodontal diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0003-9969(90)90125-Ten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2088238-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025686469en_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spageS9en_US
dc.identifier.epageS14en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990EQ19900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US

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