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Article: Changes in subgingival microbiota during puberty. A 4-year longitudinal study

TitleChanges in subgingival microbiota during puberty. A 4-year longitudinal study
Authors
Issue Date1990
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1990, v. 17 n. 10, p. 685-692 How to Cite?
AbstractIt was the purpose of the present investigation to monitor the composition of the subgingival microbiota at selected sites in individuals passing through puberty and to correlate observed changes with the development of pubertal maturation. Between the ages of 11 and 24 years, pubertal and skeletal maturation was monitored annually in 22 boys and 20 girls. During this time, subgingival microbial samples were taken every 4th to 5th month (10 times in 4 years) mesially of the upper first molars. High values in total bacterial counts were reached after the onset of puberty, followed by a decrease towards the end of the observation period. The frequency of detection of Actinomyces odontolyticus and of Capnocytophaga sp. increased with time. The frequencies of other selected species, specifically of black pigmenting Bacteroides sp. were not found to increase when tested by linear and quadratic models of time trend. However, a statistically significant rise in the frequency of detecting B. intermedius and B. melaninogenicus was noted in the initial pubertal phase identified by the onset of testicular growth in boys (p = 0.05). A significant relationship also existed between testes growth and increase of A. odontolyticus (p < 0.01). In girls, a similar increase was obtained for A. odontolyticus when studied in relation to the Tanner scores for breast development (p < 0.01). The changes observed in the subgingival microbiota during puberty may be related to the development of gingivitis, which was demonstrated by a higher tendency for gingival bleeding during the course of the pubertal maturation process.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153709
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGusberti, FAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMombelli, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMinder Ch, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:21:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:21:10Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1990, v. 17 n. 10, p. 685-692en_US
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153709-
dc.description.abstractIt was the purpose of the present investigation to monitor the composition of the subgingival microbiota at selected sites in individuals passing through puberty and to correlate observed changes with the development of pubertal maturation. Between the ages of 11 and 24 years, pubertal and skeletal maturation was monitored annually in 22 boys and 20 girls. During this time, subgingival microbial samples were taken every 4th to 5th month (10 times in 4 years) mesially of the upper first molars. High values in total bacterial counts were reached after the onset of puberty, followed by a decrease towards the end of the observation period. The frequency of detection of Actinomyces odontolyticus and of Capnocytophaga sp. increased with time. The frequencies of other selected species, specifically of black pigmenting Bacteroides sp. were not found to increase when tested by linear and quadratic models of time trend. However, a statistically significant rise in the frequency of detecting B. intermedius and B. melaninogenicus was noted in the initial pubertal phase identified by the onset of testicular growth in boys (p = 0.05). A significant relationship also existed between testes growth and increase of A. odontolyticus (p < 0.01). In girls, a similar increase was obtained for A. odontolyticus when studied in relation to the Tanner scores for breast development (p < 0.01). The changes observed in the subgingival microbiota during puberty may be related to the development of gingivitis, which was demonstrated by a higher tendency for gingival bleeding during the course of the pubertal maturation process.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshActinomyces - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAge Determination By Skeletonen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Classification - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteroides - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshCapnocytophaga - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshColony Count, Microbialen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGingiva - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGingival Hemorrhage - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshPubertyen_US
dc.subject.meshVeillonella - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.titleChanges in subgingival microbiota during puberty. A 4-year longitudinal studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2262580-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025169245en_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage685en_US
dc.identifier.epage692en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990EK07100002-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGusberti, FA=6604050465en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMombelli, A=7006180872en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMinder Ch, E=7006452657en_US

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