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Article: Nutritional factors and oral candidosis.

TitleNutritional factors and oral candidosis.
Authors
Issue Date1986
Citation
Journal Of Oral Pathology, 1986, v. 15 n. 2, p. 61-65 How to Cite?
AbstractA variety of nutritional factors including deficiencies of iron, folic acid, vitamins, and diets rich in carbohydrates have been implicated in the pathogenesis of oral candidal infections. The following reviews the growing body of data, from in vivo and in vitro studies, related to each of these implicated factors. Although much disagreement exists as to the specific roles played by these individual factors, there is little doubt that nutritional factors either acting locally or via systemic mechanisms could significantly affect the pathogenesis of oral candidoses. Hence, the role of these less well-characterised predisposing factors should be considered when one is treating patients with intractable oral candidal infections.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153587
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:20:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:20:30Z-
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Oral Pathology, 1986, v. 15 n. 2, p. 61-65en_US
dc.identifier.issn0300-9777en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153587-
dc.description.abstractA variety of nutritional factors including deficiencies of iron, folic acid, vitamins, and diets rich in carbohydrates have been implicated in the pathogenesis of oral candidal infections. The following reviews the growing body of data, from in vivo and in vitro studies, related to each of these implicated factors. Although much disagreement exists as to the specific roles played by these individual factors, there is little doubt that nutritional factors either acting locally or via systemic mechanisms could significantly affect the pathogenesis of oral candidoses. Hence, the role of these less well-characterised predisposing factors should be considered when one is treating patients with intractable oral candidal infections.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of oral pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAscorbic Acid Deficiency - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshCandidiasis, Oral - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDietary Carbohydrates - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshFolic Acid Deficiency - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIron - Deficiencyen_US
dc.subject.meshNutrition Disorders - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshVitamin A Deficiency - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshVitamin B Deficiency - Complicationsen_US
dc.titleNutritional factors and oral candidosis.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid3083063-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022667368en_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage61en_US
dc.identifier.epage65en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1986A966900001-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US

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