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Article: Dental maturity as an indicator of chronological age: The accuracy and precision of three methods

TitleDental maturity as an indicator of chronological age: The accuracy and precision of three methods
Authors
Issue Date1985
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
European Journal Of Orthodontics, 1985, v. 7 n. 1, p. 25-34 How to Cite?
AbstractThe study was designed to investigate the accuracy and precision of three different methods for estimation of chronological age (Liliequist and Lundberg, 1971; Demirjian et al., 1973 and Gustafson and Koch, 1974), based on tooth formation. Accuracy teSt. For each method, the mean difference and degree of linear correlation between estimated and true chronological age was determined in 300 3.5-12.5-year-old Swedish children. The data were arranged in subgroups according to sex and age. Precision teSt. For each method, the inter-examiner variation was studied in terms of the mean difference between the estimated age obtained from independent readings of 60 panoramic radiographs of the teeth by the two examiners. The intra-examiner variation was studied by calculating the mean difference between two independent readings of the same 60 radiographs by the same examiner.A high accuracy was found when the method proposed by Demirjian et al., was applied to 3.5-6.5-year-old children. This method showed a low accuracy in the older age-groups, however. The accuracy of the method devised by Liliequist and Lundberg (1971) was found to be low in all age-groups, and age determination using this method resulted in systematic underestimation of age. The accuracy of the method described by Gustafson and Koch (1974) was high when applied to boys, but low in girls.The precision was found to be high for the methods of Demirjian et al. (1973) and Liliequist and Lundberg (1971) but somewhat lower for the method of Gustafson and Koch (1974).Estimation of age is preferably done during early childhood. Of the methods tested, the one proposed by Demirjian et al. (1973) is the most reliable at these ages, due to its comparatively high accuracy and precision. © 1985 European Orthodontic Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153575
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.44
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.090

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHägg, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorMatsson, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:20:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:20:26Z-
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Orthodontics, 1985, v. 7 n. 1, p. 25-34en_US
dc.identifier.issn0141-5387en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153575-
dc.description.abstractThe study was designed to investigate the accuracy and precision of three different methods for estimation of chronological age (Liliequist and Lundberg, 1971; Demirjian et al., 1973 and Gustafson and Koch, 1974), based on tooth formation. Accuracy teSt. For each method, the mean difference and degree of linear correlation between estimated and true chronological age was determined in 300 3.5-12.5-year-old Swedish children. The data were arranged in subgroups according to sex and age. Precision teSt. For each method, the inter-examiner variation was studied in terms of the mean difference between the estimated age obtained from independent readings of 60 panoramic radiographs of the teeth by the two examiners. The intra-examiner variation was studied by calculating the mean difference between two independent readings of the same 60 radiographs by the same examiner.A high accuracy was found when the method proposed by Demirjian et al., was applied to 3.5-6.5-year-old children. This method showed a low accuracy in the older age-groups, however. The accuracy of the method devised by Liliequist and Lundberg (1971) was found to be low in all age-groups, and age determination using this method resulted in systematic underestimation of age. The accuracy of the method described by Gustafson and Koch (1974) was high when applied to boys, but low in girls.The precision was found to be high for the methods of Demirjian et al. (1973) and Liliequist and Lundberg (1971) but somewhat lower for the method of Gustafson and Koch (1974).Estimation of age is preferably done during early childhood. Of the methods tested, the one proposed by Demirjian et al. (1973) is the most reliable at these ages, due to its comparatively high accuracy and precision. © 1985 European Orthodontic Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ejo.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Orthodonticsen_US
dc.titleDental maturity as an indicator of chronological age: The accuracy and precision of three methodsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHägg, U:euohagg@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHägg, U=rp00020en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ejo/7.1.25en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022019494en_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage25en_US
dc.identifier.epage34en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHägg, U=7006790279en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMatsson, L=7005134462en_US

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