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Article: Growth and acid production of Candida albicans in carbohydrate supplemented media

TitleGrowth and acid production of Candida albicans in carbohydrate supplemented media
Authors
Issue Date1983
Citation
Microbios, 1983, v. 37 n. 148, p. 105-115 How to Cite?
AbstractAerobic and anaerobic growth characteristics and acid production of a clinical and a reference laboratory strain of C. albicans in 0.1 M, glucose or sucrose-supplemented batch cultures were examined for 72 h, at 37°C. Both strains gave sigmoid growth curves, aerobically, and the pH dropped from 7.0 to 3.5 in 48 h. Candidal growth or acid production was not observed in submerged, anaerobic cultures. The specific growth rate of the clinical strain of Candida was significantly greater than the reference strain, in both sugar media. The major acidic component initiating and sustaining the pH drop appeared to be acetate, although formate, pyruvate and propionate were detected in varying proportions in glucose or sucrose cultures. These anionic, acidic metabolites of C. albicans, may play a role in the pathogenesis of mucosal candidoses such as chronic atrophic candidosis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153556
ISSN
2003 Impact Factor: 0.631
2004 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.199
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeddes, DAMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeetman, DAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, TWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:20:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:20:21Z-
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.identifier.citationMicrobios, 1983, v. 37 n. 148, p. 105-115en_US
dc.identifier.issn0026-2633en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153556-
dc.description.abstractAerobic and anaerobic growth characteristics and acid production of a clinical and a reference laboratory strain of C. albicans in 0.1 M, glucose or sucrose-supplemented batch cultures were examined for 72 h, at 37°C. Both strains gave sigmoid growth curves, aerobically, and the pH dropped from 7.0 to 3.5 in 48 h. Candidal growth or acid production was not observed in submerged, anaerobic cultures. The specific growth rate of the clinical strain of Candida was significantly greater than the reference strain, in both sugar media. The major acidic component initiating and sustaining the pH drop appeared to be acetate, although formate, pyruvate and propionate were detected in varying proportions in glucose or sucrose cultures. These anionic, acidic metabolites of C. albicans, may play a role in the pathogenesis of mucosal candidoses such as chronic atrophic candidosis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMicrobiosen_US
dc.subject.meshAcetates - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAerobiosisen_US
dc.subject.meshAnaerobiosisen_US
dc.subject.meshCandida Albicans - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCulture Mediaen_US
dc.subject.meshGlucose - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshPropionic Acids - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPyruvates - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPyruvic Aciden_US
dc.subject.meshSucrose - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleGrowth and acid production of Candida albicans in carbohydrate supplemented mediaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP:lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid6353167-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0020962215en_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue148en_US
dc.identifier.spage105en_US
dc.identifier.epage115en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1983RB68400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamaranayake, LP=7102761002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeddes, DAM=7103368741en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWeetman, DA=7007149532en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacFarlane, TW=7005128465en_US

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