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Article: Histological assessment of periodontally involved cementum

TitleHistological assessment of periodontally involved cementum
Authors
Issue Date1982
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1982, v. 9 n. 3, p. 266-274 How to Cite?
AbstractContamination of periodontally involved cementum by bacterial substances such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered a major reason for root planing. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence and location of lipid and polysaccharide within involved cementum as compared with uninvolved cementum. Frozen sections were prepared from the decalcified roots of 36 periodontally diseased and two control teeth. Serial sections were stained for either lipid (Oil-Red-O) or polysaccharide (Alcian Blue - PAS) and also with haematoxylin & eosin (H & E) or Huberstone's gram stain. Specimens of involved and uninvolved cementum were then examined under the light microscope for assessment of differences. Involved cementum from 12 of the periodontally diseased teeth exhibited strongly PAS-positive stained processes penetrating 3-7 μm into the surface of cementum from overlying plaque. Such processes were not observed in uninvolved cementum, suggesting a possible bacterial origin. Lipid granules were noted in only one involved specimen where they were situated up to 10 μm beneath the cemental surface. Similar granules were observed within plaque deposits but never in uninvolved cementum, again suggesting a possible bacterial origin. H & E and gram-stained specimens revealed the presence of microbial deposits in surface defects and within defects at the cemento-dentinal junction (CDJ), as well as penetration of micro-organisms into cementum in the absence of any surface defects. The results indicate that although lipid and polysaccharide of possible bacterial origin may be present within the 10 μm surface zone of involved cementum, the finding of microbial deposits down to the level of the CDJ suggests that all periodontally involved cementum should be removed during root planing, in order to achieve a root surface free of bacterial contamination.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153546
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDaly, CGen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeymour, GJen_US
dc.contributor.authorKieser, JBen_US
dc.contributor.authorCorbet, EFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:20:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:20:18Z-
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1982, v. 9 n. 3, p. 266-274en_US
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153546-
dc.description.abstractContamination of periodontally involved cementum by bacterial substances such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is considered a major reason for root planing. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the presence and location of lipid and polysaccharide within involved cementum as compared with uninvolved cementum. Frozen sections were prepared from the decalcified roots of 36 periodontally diseased and two control teeth. Serial sections were stained for either lipid (Oil-Red-O) or polysaccharide (Alcian Blue - PAS) and also with haematoxylin & eosin (H & E) or Huberstone's gram stain. Specimens of involved and uninvolved cementum were then examined under the light microscope for assessment of differences. Involved cementum from 12 of the periodontally diseased teeth exhibited strongly PAS-positive stained processes penetrating 3-7 μm into the surface of cementum from overlying plaque. Such processes were not observed in uninvolved cementum, suggesting a possible bacterial origin. Lipid granules were noted in only one involved specimen where they were situated up to 10 μm beneath the cemental surface. Similar granules were observed within plaque deposits but never in uninvolved cementum, again suggesting a possible bacterial origin. H & E and gram-stained specimens revealed the presence of microbial deposits in surface defects and within defects at the cemento-dentinal junction (CDJ), as well as penetration of micro-organisms into cementum in the absence of any surface defects. The results indicate that although lipid and polysaccharide of possible bacterial origin may be present within the 10 μm surface zone of involved cementum, the finding of microbial deposits down to the level of the CDJ suggests that all periodontally involved cementum should be removed during root planing, in order to achieve a root surface free of bacterial contamination.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Cementum - Microbiology - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLipid Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontitis - Microbiology - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolysaccharides, Bacterial - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshStaining And Labelingen_US
dc.titleHistological assessment of periodontally involved cementumen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCorbet, EF:efcorbet@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCorbet, EF=rp00005en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid6178759-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0020071492en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage266en_US
dc.identifier.epage274en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1982NQ80800011-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDaly, CG=7103281342en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSeymour, GJ=7102909412en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKieser, JB=7005227088en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorbet, EF=35609873200en_US

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