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Article: Use of oral irrigators as vehicle for the application of antimicrobial agents in chemical plaque control

TitleUse of oral irrigators as vehicle for the application of antimicrobial agents in chemical plaque control
Authors
Issue Date1981
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPE
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1981, v. 8 n. 3, p. 177-188 How to Cite?
AbstractThe purpose of the present investigation was to study the topographical distribution of plaque formation using chlorhexidine digluconate (CH) as a mouthrinse and in oral irrigators during experimental gingivitis. Forty dental students (aged 22-26) with clean teeth and healthy gingivae abolished oral hygiene for a period of 3 weeks (Loe et al. 1965). During this period the participants were randomly assigned to one of five groups. Group A rinsed daily with 30 ml of a placebo and Group B with 30 ml 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate. In Groups C and E a fractionated jet irrigator was used for the daily application of 600 ml placebo (C) or 0.05% CH (E); 600 ml of 0.05% CH was also used in a monojet irrigator (Group D). At the start, after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of no oral hygiene and 1 week following reinstituted oral hygiene, plaque was assessed using the Plaque Index (Silness & Loe 1964) and gingival health was scored according to the criteria of the Gingival Index (Loe & Silness 1963). The discoloration of the teeth was determined using a set of color photos. During the experiment all groups reached plaque levels that were significantly different from each other. The highest PlI were seen in the placebo rinsing group (A) followed by placebo irrigation (C). Plaque was significantly reduced in the CH groups. However, rinsing (B) formed significantly more plaque than using the oral irrigator (D, E). Group E showed the least amount of plaque. In addition, the interproximal PlI were equally low as the buccal and lingual. With CH (B, D, E), gingivitis did not develop except for some interproximals in Group B. A fractionated jet irrigator was more effective for the application of CH than rinsing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153535
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.848
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLang, NPen_US
dc.contributor.authorRaeber, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T08:20:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T08:20:14Z-
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Periodontology, 1981, v. 8 n. 3, p. 177-188en_US
dc.identifier.issn0303-6979en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153535-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the present investigation was to study the topographical distribution of plaque formation using chlorhexidine digluconate (CH) as a mouthrinse and in oral irrigators during experimental gingivitis. Forty dental students (aged 22-26) with clean teeth and healthy gingivae abolished oral hygiene for a period of 3 weeks (Loe et al. 1965). During this period the participants were randomly assigned to one of five groups. Group A rinsed daily with 30 ml of a placebo and Group B with 30 ml 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate. In Groups C and E a fractionated jet irrigator was used for the daily application of 600 ml placebo (C) or 0.05% CH (E); 600 ml of 0.05% CH was also used in a monojet irrigator (Group D). At the start, after 1, 2 and 3 weeks of no oral hygiene and 1 week following reinstituted oral hygiene, plaque was assessed using the Plaque Index (Silness & Loe 1964) and gingival health was scored according to the criteria of the Gingival Index (Loe & Silness 1963). The discoloration of the teeth was determined using a set of color photos. During the experiment all groups reached plaque levels that were significantly different from each other. The highest PlI were seen in the placebo rinsing group (A) followed by placebo irrigation (C). Plaque was significantly reduced in the CH groups. However, rinsing (B) formed significantly more plaque than using the oral irrigator (D, E). Group E showed the least amount of plaque. In addition, the interproximal PlI were equally low as the buccal and lingual. With CH (B, D, E), gingivitis did not develop except for some interproximals in Group B. A fractionated jet irrigator was more effective for the application of CH than rinsing.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/CPEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Periodontologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshChlorhexidine - Administration & Dosage - Analogs & Derivatives - Therapeutic Useen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Devices, Home Careen_US
dc.subject.meshDental Plaque - Analysis - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshGingivitis - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMouthwashesen_US
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshRandom Allocationen_US
dc.subject.meshTherapeutic Irrigation - Instrumentationen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTooth Discoloration - Etiologyen_US
dc.titleUse of oral irrigators as vehicle for the application of antimicrobial agents in chemical plaque controlen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLang, NP:nplang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLang, NP=rp00031en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid6947984-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0019450019en_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage177en_US
dc.identifier.epage188en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1981MF12000003-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLang, NP=7201577367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRaeber, K=6504612057en_US

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