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Book Chapter: Effects of video triggers on the PBL process

TitleEffects of video triggers on the PBL process
Authors
KeywordsMedical Student
Problem Identification
Critical Thinking
Problem Description
Real Patient
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Effects of video triggers on the PBL process. In Bridges S... (et al) (Eds.), Problem-based learning in clinical education: The next generation, p. 139-150. Dordrecht: Springer, 2012 How to Cite?
AbstractIn medical problem-based learning (PBL), video cases appear to be welcomed by students and facilitators. However, it has been proposed that junior medical students without much clinical experience may focus more on problem identification and description, and consequently less on problem exploration, which is more important in the learning of problem solving in PBL (Hmelo-Silver, Educational Psychology Review, 16(3), 235–266, 2004). In order to find out if this occurs, we recorded, transcribed and coded the PBL sessions of a group of students and a facilitator working on a paper case and then on a video case. It was found that in the video case, when compared to the paper case, the students spent more of their discussion on problem identification and less on problem description. The percentage of transcript units in problem identification and description was actually lower in the video-triggered case than in the paper-triggered case. Moreover, the percentage of transcript units in problem exploration was higher in the video-trigger case than in the paper-triggered case. In conclusion, there is no evidence to suggest that video triggers would act as a distraction to the learning of critical thinking and problem-solving skills even in junior medical students with little clinical experience.
DescriptionInnovation and change in professional education: v. 8
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153353
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, LKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, ALMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T10:08:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T10:08:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEffects of video triggers on the PBL process. In Bridges S... (et al) (Eds.), Problem-based learning in clinical education: The next generation, p. 139-150. Dordrecht: Springer, 2012-
dc.identifier.isbn9789400725140-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153353-
dc.descriptionInnovation and change in professional education: v. 8-
dc.description.abstractIn medical problem-based learning (PBL), video cases appear to be welcomed by students and facilitators. However, it has been proposed that junior medical students without much clinical experience may focus more on problem identification and description, and consequently less on problem exploration, which is more important in the learning of problem solving in PBL (Hmelo-Silver, Educational Psychology Review, 16(3), 235–266, 2004). In order to find out if this occurs, we recorded, transcribed and coded the PBL sessions of a group of students and a facilitator working on a paper case and then on a video case. It was found that in the video case, when compared to the paper case, the students spent more of their discussion on problem identification and less on problem description. The percentage of transcript units in problem identification and description was actually lower in the video-triggered case than in the paper-triggered case. Moreover, the percentage of transcript units in problem exploration was higher in the video-trigger case than in the paper-triggered case. In conclusion, there is no evidence to suggest that video triggers would act as a distraction to the learning of critical thinking and problem-solving skills even in junior medical students with little clinical experience.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofProblem-based learning in clinical education: The next generation-
dc.subjectMedical Student-
dc.subjectProblem Identification-
dc.subjectCritical Thinking-
dc.subjectProblem Description-
dc.subjectReal Patient-
dc.titleEffects of video triggers on the PBL processen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, LK: lapki@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLu, J: jingyan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, ALM: amberyip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LK=rp00536en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLu, J=rp00930en_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-94-007-2515-7_9-
dc.identifier.hkuros201893en_US
dc.identifier.spage139en_US
dc.identifier.epage150en_US
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht-

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