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Article: Identification and classification of facial familiarity in directed lying: an ERP Study

TitleIdentification and classification of facial familiarity in directed lying: an ERP Study
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS One, 2012, v. 7 n. 2, article no. e31250 How to Cite?
AbstractRecognizing familiar faces is essential to social functioning, but little is known about how people identify human faces and classify them in terms of familiarity. Face identification involves discriminating familiar faces from unfamiliar faces, whereas face classification involves making an intentional decision to classify faces as 'familiar' or 'unfamiliar.' This study used a directed-lying task to explore the differentiation between identification and classification processes involved in the recognition of familiar faces. To explore this issue, the participants in this study were shown familiar and unfamiliar faces. They responded to these faces (i.e., as familiar or unfamiliar) in accordance with the instructions they were given (i.e., to lie or to tell the truth) while their EEG activity was recorded. Familiar faces (regardless of lying vs. truth) elicited significantly less negative-going N400f in the middle and right parietal and temporal regions than unfamiliar faces. Regardless of their actual familiarity, the faces that the participants classified as 'familiar' elicited more negative-going N400f in the central and right temporal regions than those classified as 'unfamiliar.' The P600 was related primarily with the facial identification process. Familiar faces (regardless of lying vs. truth) elicited more positive-going P600f in the middle parietal and middle occipital regions. The results suggest that N400f and P600f play different roles in the processes involved in facial recognition. The N400f appears to be associated with both the identification (judgment of familiarity) and classification of faces, while it is likely that the P600f is only associated with the identification process (recollection of facial information). Future studies should use different experimental paradigms to validate the generalizability of the results of this study.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153235
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CCHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T10:00:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T10:00:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 2012, v. 7 n. 2, article no. e31250en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153235-
dc.description.abstractRecognizing familiar faces is essential to social functioning, but little is known about how people identify human faces and classify them in terms of familiarity. Face identification involves discriminating familiar faces from unfamiliar faces, whereas face classification involves making an intentional decision to classify faces as 'familiar' or 'unfamiliar.' This study used a directed-lying task to explore the differentiation between identification and classification processes involved in the recognition of familiar faces. To explore this issue, the participants in this study were shown familiar and unfamiliar faces. They responded to these faces (i.e., as familiar or unfamiliar) in accordance with the instructions they were given (i.e., to lie or to tell the truth) while their EEG activity was recorded. Familiar faces (regardless of lying vs. truth) elicited significantly less negative-going N400f in the middle and right parietal and temporal regions than unfamiliar faces. Regardless of their actual familiarity, the faces that the participants classified as 'familiar' elicited more negative-going N400f in the central and right temporal regions than those classified as 'unfamiliar.' The P600 was related primarily with the facial identification process. Familiar faces (regardless of lying vs. truth) elicited more positive-going P600f in the middle parietal and middle occipital regions. The results suggest that N400f and P600f play different roles in the processes involved in facial recognition. The N400f appears to be associated with both the identification (judgment of familiarity) and classification of faces, while it is likely that the P600f is only associated with the identification process (recollection of facial information). Future studies should use different experimental paradigms to validate the generalizability of the results of this study.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshDeception-
dc.subject.meshElectroencephalography-
dc.subject.meshEvoked Potentials - physiology-
dc.subject.meshRecognition (Psychology) - classification-
dc.subject.meshTask Performance and Analysis-
dc.titleIdentification and classification of facial familiarity in directed lying: an ERP Studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSun, D: sundelin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CCH: chetwyn.chan@inet.polyu.edu.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySun, D=rp00873en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0031250en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22363597-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3283635-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857437422en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros201605en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857437422&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2, article no. e31250en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302873700040-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, D=25029722800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CCH=16244174500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, TMC=7501437381en_HK

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