File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Pilot study for subgroup classification for autism spectrum disorder based on dysmorphology and physical measurements in Chinese children

TitlePilot study for subgroup classification for autism spectrum disorder based on dysmorphology and physical measurements in Chinese children
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Pediatrics medical sciences
Psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2012
PublisherMac Keith Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mackeith.co.uk/journal.html
Citation
The Joint 12th International Child Neurology Congress (ICNC 2012) and the 11th Asian and Oceanian Congress of Child Neurology, Brisbane, Australia, 27 May-1 June 2012. In Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 2012, v. 54 suppl. s4, p. 67, abstract B2-0006 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by deficits in three main domains: communication, social skills and repetitive/stereotyped behaviours. The impact of ASD significantly varies between individuals, along the continuum of severity in its presentation, symptoms and treatment outcome. Currently there is no cure for ASD, and the clinical variability still remains. Hence the search to unravel homogeneous subgroups to facilitate ASD research, towards providing a better understanding of the entire disorder. DESIGN: Descriptive study. METHOD: In this study, a norm of physical measurements including height, weight, head circumference, ear length, outer and inner canthus, interpupillary distance, philtrum and hand and foot length was collected from 658 typical developing (TD) Chinese children (mean age=4y 2mo) and 80 Chinese ASD children (mean age=4y 4mo). We then attempted to find subgroups within ASD participants based on physical abnormalities and generalized dysmorphology; individuals were classified as dysmorphic with the Autism Dysmorphology Measure (ADM) from dysmorphic examination coding of 12 body regions. RESULTS: Our results show that there was a significant difference between TD and ASD groups in measurements for head circumference (P=0.009), outer (P=0.021) and inner (P=0.021) canthus, philtrum length (P=0.003) and right (P=0.023) and left (P=0.20) foot length. Within the 80 ASD patients, 37 (46.25%) were classified as dysmorphic (P=0.00). CONCLUSION: This study attempts to identify subgroups within ASD patients based on physical measurements and dysmorphology examinations. The identification of homogeneous subgroups within ASD will benefit the development of future diagnosis, referral and treatment plans.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. is Special Issue: Abstracts of the 12th International Child Neurology Congress and the 11th Asian and Oceanian Congress of Child Neurology ... 2012
Concurrent Poster Sessions - Stream B: Development, Cognition and Psychiatry 1: B2-0006
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153125
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.615
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.636

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, P-
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:57:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:57:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Joint 12th International Child Neurology Congress (ICNC 2012) and the 11th Asian and Oceanian Congress of Child Neurology, Brisbane, Australia, 27 May-1 June 2012. In Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 2012, v. 54 suppl. s4, p. 67, abstract B2-0006en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-1622-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/153125-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is Special Issue: Abstracts of the 12th International Child Neurology Congress and the 11th Asian and Oceanian Congress of Child Neurology ... 2012-
dc.descriptionConcurrent Poster Sessions - Stream B: Development, Cognition and Psychiatry 1: B2-0006-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by deficits in three main domains: communication, social skills and repetitive/stereotyped behaviours. The impact of ASD significantly varies between individuals, along the continuum of severity in its presentation, symptoms and treatment outcome. Currently there is no cure for ASD, and the clinical variability still remains. Hence the search to unravel homogeneous subgroups to facilitate ASD research, towards providing a better understanding of the entire disorder. DESIGN: Descriptive study. METHOD: In this study, a norm of physical measurements including height, weight, head circumference, ear length, outer and inner canthus, interpupillary distance, philtrum and hand and foot length was collected from 658 typical developing (TD) Chinese children (mean age=4y 2mo) and 80 Chinese ASD children (mean age=4y 4mo). We then attempted to find subgroups within ASD participants based on physical abnormalities and generalized dysmorphology; individuals were classified as dysmorphic with the Autism Dysmorphology Measure (ADM) from dysmorphic examination coding of 12 body regions. RESULTS: Our results show that there was a significant difference between TD and ASD groups in measurements for head circumference (P=0.009), outer (P=0.021) and inner (P=0.021) canthus, philtrum length (P=0.003) and right (P=0.023) and left (P=0.20) foot length. Within the 80 ASD patients, 37 (46.25%) were classified as dysmorphic (P=0.00). CONCLUSION: This study attempts to identify subgroups within ASD patients based on physical measurements and dysmorphology examinations. The identification of homogeneous subgroups within ASD will benefit the development of future diagnosis, referral and treatment plans.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMac Keith Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mackeith.co.uk/journal.html-
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurologyen_US
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectPediatrics medical sciences-
dc.subjectPsychiatry and neurology-
dc.titlePilot study for subgroup classification for autism spectrum disorder based on dysmorphology and physical measurements in Chinese childrenen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, V: vcnwong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, P: wongtyp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-8749.2012.04283.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros200485en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros200570-
dc.identifier.volume54-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. s4-
dc.identifier.spage67-
dc.identifier.epage67-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130415-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats