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Article: Early procedure-related complications of fetal blood sampling and intrauterine transfusion for fetal anemia

TitleEarly procedure-related complications of fetal blood sampling and intrauterine transfusion for fetal anemia
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0412
Citation
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 2012, v. 91 n. 4, p. 458-462 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To review the procedure-related complication rates following fetal blood sampling and intrauterine red cell transfusion for anaemic fetuses at a single tertiary center. DESIGN: A retrospective study of 114 intrauterine transfusions. SETTING: A single tertiary referral fetal medicine center at Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK. SAMPLE: All cases (114) undergoing fetal blood sampling and intrauterine transfusion between January 2003 and May 2010. METHODS: Early procedure-related complications (severe fetal bradycardia requiring either abandonment of the procedure or emergency delivery, fetal death, preterm labor or rupture of membranes) were investigated by review of computerized records and individual chart review. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Live birth rate, perinatal mortality, procedure-related fetal bradycardia, preterm labor and procedure-related spontaneous rupture of membranes. RESULTS: The majority of cases (77.8%) were due to red cell alloimmunization, with anti-D being the commonest cause. The live birth rate was 93.5%, with a procedure-related fetal death rate of 0.9%. The preterm labor rate (<37 weeks' gestation) was 3.5% only occurring in patients undergoing multiple (>3) fetal transfusions. Complications in this series did not appear to be increased the earlier the gestation at which the first transfusion took place. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a reduction in the number of cases requiring intrauterine therapy for fetal anemia, contemporary outcomes appear to be good if not improving. It is important that the experience required to manage these cases should be concentrated in fewer centers to maximize good perinatal outcome.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152939
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.191
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.197
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Moonbeam Trust1110961
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre (BRC)
Funding Information:

T.P. was funded by the Moonbeam Trust (Registered charity 1110961). S. K. was funded by the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) scheme.

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJohnstone-Ayliffe, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrior, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorOng, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorRegan, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:52:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:52:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 2012, v. 91 n. 4, p. 458-462en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-6349-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152939-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To review the procedure-related complication rates following fetal blood sampling and intrauterine red cell transfusion for anaemic fetuses at a single tertiary center. DESIGN: A retrospective study of 114 intrauterine transfusions. SETTING: A single tertiary referral fetal medicine center at Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, Imperial College London, London, UK. SAMPLE: All cases (114) undergoing fetal blood sampling and intrauterine transfusion between January 2003 and May 2010. METHODS: Early procedure-related complications (severe fetal bradycardia requiring either abandonment of the procedure or emergency delivery, fetal death, preterm labor or rupture of membranes) were investigated by review of computerized records and individual chart review. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Live birth rate, perinatal mortality, procedure-related fetal bradycardia, preterm labor and procedure-related spontaneous rupture of membranes. RESULTS: The majority of cases (77.8%) were due to red cell alloimmunization, with anti-D being the commonest cause. The live birth rate was 93.5%, with a procedure-related fetal death rate of 0.9%. The preterm labor rate (<37 weeks' gestation) was 3.5% only occurring in patients undergoing multiple (>3) fetal transfusions. Complications in this series did not appear to be increased the earlier the gestation at which the first transfusion took place. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a reduction in the number of cases requiring intrauterine therapy for fetal anemia, contemporary outcomes appear to be good if not improving. It is important that the experience required to manage these cases should be concentrated in fewer centers to maximize good perinatal outcome.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0412-
dc.relation.ispartofActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavicaen_US
dc.rightsActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshAnemia - etiology - mortality - therapy-
dc.subject.meshBlood Transfusion, Intrauterine - adverse effects - mortality-
dc.subject.meshCordocentesis - adverse effects-
dc.subject.meshFetal Diseases - etiology - mortality - therapy-
dc.subject.meshFetal Membranes, Premature Rupture - etiology-
dc.titleEarly procedure-related complications of fetal blood sampling and intrauterine transfusion for fetal anemiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailOng, C: cytong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityOng, CYT=rp00482en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0412.2011.01353.x-
dc.identifier.pmid22356474-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863380524-
dc.identifier.hkuros201121en_US
dc.identifier.volume91en_US
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage458en_US
dc.identifier.epage462en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000301712700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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