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Article: An analysis of the educational value of low-fidelity anatomy models as external representations
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TitleAn analysis of the educational value of low-fidelity anatomy models as external representations
 
AuthorsChan, LK1
Cheng, MMW2
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1935-9780/issues/
 
CitationAnatomical Sciences Education, 2011, v. 4 n. 5, p. 256-263 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.239
 
AbstractAlthough high-fidelity digital models of human anatomy based on actual cross-sectional images of the human body have been developed, reports on the use of physical models in anatomy teaching continue to appear. This article aims to examine the common features shared by these physical models and analyze their educational value based on the literature on cognition, learning, and external representations. A literature search on these physical models in three popular anatomy journals published over a 10-year period from 2001 to 2010 found that all of them have low fidelity: they oftentimes do not closely resemble the regions of the human body they are representing. They include only a small number of the structures that exist in these regions of the human body and do not accurately represent the shape and surface details of these structures. However, these models strongly correspond to the human body in the spatial relationship of the represented structures, which is crucial to achieving their educational purpose of teaching three-dimensional comprehension and anatomical reasoning. The educational value of these models includes acting as memory aids, reducing cognitive overload, facilitating problem solving, and arousing students' enthusiasm and participation. Because these models often lack a close resemblance to the human body, their use in anatomy teaching should always be accompanied by adequate explanations to the students to establish the correspondence between the models and the parts of the human body they are representing.
 
ISSN1935-9772
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.239
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000294987200003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, LK
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, MMW
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:51:35Z
 
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:51:35Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractAlthough high-fidelity digital models of human anatomy based on actual cross-sectional images of the human body have been developed, reports on the use of physical models in anatomy teaching continue to appear. This article aims to examine the common features shared by these physical models and analyze their educational value based on the literature on cognition, learning, and external representations. A literature search on these physical models in three popular anatomy journals published over a 10-year period from 2001 to 2010 found that all of them have low fidelity: they oftentimes do not closely resemble the regions of the human body they are representing. They include only a small number of the structures that exist in these regions of the human body and do not accurately represent the shape and surface details of these structures. However, these models strongly correspond to the human body in the spatial relationship of the represented structures, which is crucial to achieving their educational purpose of teaching three-dimensional comprehension and anatomical reasoning. The educational value of these models includes acting as memory aids, reducing cognitive overload, facilitating problem solving, and arousing students' enthusiasm and participation. Because these models often lack a close resemblance to the human body, their use in anatomy teaching should always be accompanied by adequate explanations to the students to establish the correspondence between the models and the parts of the human body they are representing.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAnatomical Sciences Education, 2011, v. 4 n. 5, p. 256-263 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.239
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ase.239
 
dc.identifier.eissn1935-9780
 
dc.identifier.epage263
 
dc.identifier.hkuros201856
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294987200003
 
dc.identifier.issn1935-9772
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid21744512
 
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dc.identifier.spage256
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152919
 
dc.identifier.volume4
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1935-9780/issues/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAnatomical Sciences Education
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsAnatomical Sciences Education. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc..
 
dc.subject.meshAnatomy - education
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshModels, Anatomic
 
dc.titleAn analysis of the educational value of low-fidelity anatomy models as external representations
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong