File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Single-incision versus conventional laparoscopic colectomy for colonic neoplasm: a randomized, controlled trial
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleSingle-incision versus conventional laparoscopic colectomy for colonic neoplasm: a randomized, controlled trial
 
AuthorsPoon, JTC1
Cheung, CW1
Fan, JKM1
Lo, OSH1
Law, WL1
 
KeywordsCancer
Colorectal
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
 
CitationSurgical Endoscopy, 2012, v. 26 n. 10, p. 2729-2734 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-012-2262-z
 
AbstractBackground: Single-incision laparoscopic colectomy (SILC) is a newly developed procedure with the benefit of better cosmetic outcome and potentially reduced wound pain compared with conventionally laparoscopic colectomy (CLC). However, the application of SILC requires careful evaluation to prove its benefit and safety. This randomized, controlled study compared the operative outcome of patients who underwent SILC and CLC. Methods: Patients who had small cancer (<4 cm) or adenomatous polyp requiring colectomy were randomized to have SILC or CLC. The patients were blinded to the procedures and the postoperative pain was used as the primary outcome measure. All patients had patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine after the operation and the nominal rating score on days 1-3 and day 14 were recorded by research staff, who did not known the types of operations. Other operative outcomes of the two groups of patients also were recorded prospectively and compared. Results: There were 25 patients in each group. The patients' demographics, tumor characteristics, operating time, blood loss, complication rate, number of lymph nodes harvested, and resection margin have no statistically significant difference between the two groups. There was no operative mortality in both groups. The SILC group had consistently lower median pain score than CLC group in the whole postoperative course and the difference was statistically significant on day 1 (0 (0-5) vs. day 3 (0-6) respectively; p = 0.002) and day 2 (0 (0-3) vs. 2 (0-8) respectively; p = 0.014). The median hospital stay in the SILC group also was shorter the CLC group. Conclusions: In a selected group of patients with small tumor and good operative risk, SILC is a safe alternative to CLC. Single-port laparoscopic colectomy also is associated with the benefits of less postoperative pain and shorter hospital stay than CLC. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
 
ISSN0930-2794
2013 Impact Factor: 3.313
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-012-2262-z
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000309175200004
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorPoon, JTC
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CW
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, JKM
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, OSH
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WL
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:51:05Z
 
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:51:05Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Single-incision laparoscopic colectomy (SILC) is a newly developed procedure with the benefit of better cosmetic outcome and potentially reduced wound pain compared with conventionally laparoscopic colectomy (CLC). However, the application of SILC requires careful evaluation to prove its benefit and safety. This randomized, controlled study compared the operative outcome of patients who underwent SILC and CLC. Methods: Patients who had small cancer (<4 cm) or adenomatous polyp requiring colectomy were randomized to have SILC or CLC. The patients were blinded to the procedures and the postoperative pain was used as the primary outcome measure. All patients had patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine after the operation and the nominal rating score on days 1-3 and day 14 were recorded by research staff, who did not known the types of operations. Other operative outcomes of the two groups of patients also were recorded prospectively and compared. Results: There were 25 patients in each group. The patients' demographics, tumor characteristics, operating time, blood loss, complication rate, number of lymph nodes harvested, and resection margin have no statistically significant difference between the two groups. There was no operative mortality in both groups. The SILC group had consistently lower median pain score than CLC group in the whole postoperative course and the difference was statistically significant on day 1 (0 (0-5) vs. day 3 (0-6) respectively; p = 0.002) and day 2 (0 (0-3) vs. 2 (0-8) respectively; p = 0.014). The median hospital stay in the SILC group also was shorter the CLC group. Conclusions: In a selected group of patients with small tumor and good operative risk, SILC is a safe alternative to CLC. Single-port laparoscopic colectomy also is associated with the benefits of less postoperative pain and shorter hospital stay than CLC. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSurgical Endoscopy, 2012, v. 26 n. 10, p. 2729-2734 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-012-2262-z
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10652109
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-012-2262-z
 
dc.identifier.epage2734
 
dc.identifier.hkuros200929
 
dc.identifier.hkuros204272
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309175200004
 
dc.identifier.issn0930-2794
2013 Impact Factor: 3.313
 
dc.identifier.pmid22538676
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84871609834
 
dc.identifier.spage2729
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152876
 
dc.identifier.volume26
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofSurgical Endoscopy
 
dc.subjectCancer
 
dc.subjectColorectal
 
dc.titleSingle-incision versus conventional laparoscopic colectomy for colonic neoplasm: a randomized, controlled trial
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Poon, JTC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheung, CW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fan, JKM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, OSH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Law, WL</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-07-16T09:51:05Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-07-16T09:51:05Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Surgical Endoscopy, 2012, v. 26 n. 10, p. 2729-2734</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0930-2794</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/152876</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Background: Single-incision laparoscopic colectomy (SILC) is a newly developed procedure with the benefit of better cosmetic outcome and potentially reduced wound pain compared with conventionally laparoscopic colectomy (CLC). However, the application of SILC requires careful evaluation to prove its benefit and safety. This randomized, controlled study compared the operative outcome of patients who underwent SILC and CLC. Methods: Patients who had small cancer (&lt;4&#160;cm) or adenomatous polyp requiring colectomy were randomized to have SILC or CLC. The patients were blinded to the procedures and the postoperative pain was used as the primary outcome measure. All patients had patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine after the operation and the nominal rating score on days 1-3 and day 14 were recorded by research staff, who did not known the types of operations. Other operative outcomes of the two groups of patients also were recorded prospectively and compared. Results: There were 25 patients in each group. The patients&apos; demographics, tumor characteristics, operating time, blood loss, complication rate, number of lymph nodes harvested, and resection margin have no statistically significant difference between the two groups. There was no operative mortality in both groups. The SILC group had consistently lower median pain score than CLC group in the whole postoperative course and the difference was statistically significant on day 1 (0 (0-5) vs. day 3 (0-6) respectively; p&#160;=&#160;0.002) and day 2 (0 (0-3) vs. 2 (0-8) respectively; p&#160;=&#160;0.014). The median hospital stay in the SILC group also was shorter the CLC group. Conclusions: In a selected group of patients with small tumor and good operative risk, SILC is a safe alternative to CLC. Single-port laparoscopic colectomy also is associated with the benefits of less postoperative pain and shorter hospital stay than CLC. &#169; 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Springer New York LLC. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00464/</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Surgical Endoscopy</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Cancer</subject>
<subject>Colorectal</subject>
<title>Single-incision versus conventional laparoscopic colectomy for colonic neoplasm: a randomized, controlled trial</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1007/s00464-012-2262-z</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>22538676</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-84871609834</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>200929</identifier.hkuros>
<identifier.hkuros>204272</identifier.hkuros>
<identifier.volume>26</identifier.volume>
<identifier.spage>2729</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>2734</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000309175200004</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>10652109</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong