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Article: Review of primary hypothyroidism in very low birthweight infants in a perinatal centre in Hong Kong

TitleReview of primary hypothyroidism in very low birthweight infants in a perinatal centre in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordsneurodevelopmental outcome
primary hypothyroidism
very low birthweight
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JPC
Citation
Journal Of Paediatrics And Child Health, 2011, v. 47 n. 11, p. 824-831 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: To review the incidence and risk factors of primary hypothyroidism in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants in our centre and to assess their neurodevelopmental outcome. Method: Retrospective, descriptive review of VLBW infants with primary hypothyroidism from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008 in a perinatal centre. Case control comparisons for neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months, nested to a prospective VLBW cohort (Vermont Oxford Database). Results: Twelve cases were identified, with the incidence of primary hypothyroidism of 1 in 55 live births in our VLBW cohort during the 9-year study period. Umbilical cord blood thyroid-stimulating hormone was abnormal in less than half of the cases using the current cut-off (≤14 mIU/L). Five cases were transient in nature, four cases were permanent and the causes for the rest remained undetermined at the time of review. Elevation of thyroid-stimulating hormone was first evident at a mean of 2.4 weeks post-natally. Follow-up assessment reviewed normal development in 83% of cases (10 out of 12 cases). There was no statistically significant difference in Griffith's scores at 18 months between the case and matched controls. Conclusions: The high incidence of primary hypothyroidism in our VLBW cohort deserved stringent monitoring of thyroid function post-natally. Umbilical cord blood screening was not useful as a screening tool because of its low sensitivity. Neurodevelopmental outcome for treated primary hypothyroidism was favourable as assessed at 18 months of age. © © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152785
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.477
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.692
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChee, YYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:48:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:48:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Paediatrics And Child Health, 2011, v. 47 n. 11, p. 824-831en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1034-4810en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152785-
dc.description.abstractAims: To review the incidence and risk factors of primary hypothyroidism in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants in our centre and to assess their neurodevelopmental outcome. Method: Retrospective, descriptive review of VLBW infants with primary hypothyroidism from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008 in a perinatal centre. Case control comparisons for neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months, nested to a prospective VLBW cohort (Vermont Oxford Database). Results: Twelve cases were identified, with the incidence of primary hypothyroidism of 1 in 55 live births in our VLBW cohort during the 9-year study period. Umbilical cord blood thyroid-stimulating hormone was abnormal in less than half of the cases using the current cut-off (≤14 mIU/L). Five cases were transient in nature, four cases were permanent and the causes for the rest remained undetermined at the time of review. Elevation of thyroid-stimulating hormone was first evident at a mean of 2.4 weeks post-natally. Follow-up assessment reviewed normal development in 83% of cases (10 out of 12 cases). There was no statistically significant difference in Griffith's scores at 18 months between the case and matched controls. Conclusions: The high incidence of primary hypothyroidism in our VLBW cohort deserved stringent monitoring of thyroid function post-natally. Umbilical cord blood screening was not useful as a screening tool because of its low sensitivity. Neurodevelopmental outcome for treated primary hypothyroidism was favourable as assessed at 18 months of age. © © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JPCen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Paediatrics and Child Healthen_HK
dc.subjectneurodevelopmental outcomeen_HK
dc.subjectprimary hypothyroidismen_HK
dc.subjectvery low birthweighten_HK
dc.titleReview of primary hypothyroidism in very low birthweight infants in a perinatal centre in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, L: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, L=rp00337en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1754.2011.02033.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21435074-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81455141663en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros200683en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81455141663&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume47en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage824en_HK
dc.identifier.epage831en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297915200014-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChee, YY=36553922200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KY=37096569800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, L=7007049461en_HK

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