File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products is associated with severity of sleep disordered breathing but not insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic men with obstructive sleep apnoea.
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleIncreased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products is associated with severity of sleep disordered breathing but not insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic men with obstructive sleep apnoea.
 
AuthorsLam, JCM1
Tan, KCB1
Lai, AYK1
Lam, DCL1
Ip, MSM1
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/sleep
 
CitationSleep Medicine, 2012, v. 13 n. 1, p. 15-20 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2011.07.015
 
AbstractBACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes mellitus are known to have increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and this is also associated with insulin resistance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum AGEs and insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). METHODS: Adult males with no known comorbidities were recruited from the sleep clinic of a university teaching hospital. They underwent overnight in-laboratory polysomnography. Fasting blood was taken to measure serum AGE and plasma glucose levels. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the short insulin tolerance test. RESULTS: In total, 105 subjects with a mean age of 43.5 (standard deviation [SD] 9.2)years, mean body mass index of 27.1 (SD 4.0)kg/m(2), and median apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 17 (interquartile range 5-46) were analysed. Serum AGE levels were significantly higher in subjects with OSA (AHI >/=5), compared with those without OSA (AHI <5) (3.9 [SD 1.2] vs. 3.2 [SD 0.8]mug/ml, respectively; P=0.037) after adjusting for confounders. AGE levels were positively correlated with AHI (r=0.318, P=0.001), but not with insulin sensitivity. AGE levels decreased in subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA who received continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for three months (n=18, P=0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Serum AGE levels correlate with AHI in non-diabetic adult males. This relationship cannot be explained by insulin sensitivity. Supporting the hypothesis of a direct relationship between AHI and AGEs, AGE levels were found to decline with CPAP therapy.
 
ISSN1389-9457
2013 Impact Factor: 3.100
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.391
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2011.07.015
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000300131900005
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Committee of Research
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilHKU7582/06M
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank Ms. Pui Pui Ku for manual scoring of all polysomnograms. This study was supported by a grant award from the Committee of Research and Conference Grants, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU7582/06M).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLam, JCM
 
dc.contributor.authorTan, KCB
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, AYK
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, DCL
 
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSM
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:47:36Z
 
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:47:36Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes mellitus are known to have increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and this is also associated with insulin resistance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum AGEs and insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). METHODS: Adult males with no known comorbidities were recruited from the sleep clinic of a university teaching hospital. They underwent overnight in-laboratory polysomnography. Fasting blood was taken to measure serum AGE and plasma glucose levels. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the short insulin tolerance test. RESULTS: In total, 105 subjects with a mean age of 43.5 (standard deviation [SD] 9.2)years, mean body mass index of 27.1 (SD 4.0)kg/m(2), and median apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 17 (interquartile range 5-46) were analysed. Serum AGE levels were significantly higher in subjects with OSA (AHI >/=5), compared with those without OSA (AHI <5) (3.9 [SD 1.2] vs. 3.2 [SD 0.8]mug/ml, respectively; P=0.037) after adjusting for confounders. AGE levels were positively correlated with AHI (r=0.318, P=0.001), but not with insulin sensitivity. AGE levels decreased in subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA who received continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for three months (n=18, P=0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Serum AGE levels correlate with AHI in non-diabetic adult males. This relationship cannot be explained by insulin sensitivity. Supporting the hypothesis of a direct relationship between AHI and AGEs, AGE levels were found to decline with CPAP therapy.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSleep Medicine, 2012, v. 13 n. 1, p. 15-20 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2011.07.015
 
dc.identifier.citeulike10122709
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2011.07.015
 
dc.identifier.epage20
 
dc.identifier.hkuros201507
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300131900005
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Committee of Research
University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Research Grant CouncilHKU7582/06M
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank Ms. Pui Pui Ku for manual scoring of all polysomnograms. This study was supported by a grant award from the Committee of Research and Conference Grants, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU7582/06M).

 
dc.identifier.issn1389-9457
2013 Impact Factor: 3.100
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.391
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid22137116
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84355161923
 
dc.identifier.spage15
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152762
 
dc.identifier.volume13
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/sleep
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofSleep Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - analysis
 
dc.subject.meshGlycosylation End Products, Advanced - blood
 
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea Syndromes - blood - physiopathology
 
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructive - blood - physiopathology - therapy
 
dc.titleIncreased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products is associated with severity of sleep disordered breathing but not insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic men with obstructive sleep apnoea.
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Lam, JCM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tan, KCB</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lai, AYK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, DCL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ip, MSM</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-07-16T09:47:36Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-07-16T09:47:36Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Sleep Medicine, 2012, v. 13 n. 1, p. 15-20</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1389-9457</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/152762</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>BACKGROUND: Patients with diabetes mellitus are known to have increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and this is also associated with insulin resistance. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum AGEs and insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). METHODS: Adult males with no known comorbidities were recruited from the sleep clinic of a university teaching hospital. They underwent overnight in-laboratory polysomnography. Fasting blood was taken to measure serum AGE and plasma glucose levels. Insulin sensitivity was estimated using the short insulin tolerance test. RESULTS: In total, 105 subjects with a mean age of 43.5 (standard deviation [SD] 9.2)years, mean body mass index of 27.1 (SD 4.0)kg/m(2), and median apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 17 (interquartile range 5-46) were analysed. Serum AGE levels were significantly higher in subjects with OSA (AHI &gt;/=5), compared with those without OSA (AHI &lt;5) (3.9 [SD 1.2] vs. 3.2 [SD 0.8]mug/ml, respectively; P=0.037) after adjusting for confounders. AGE levels were positively correlated with AHI (r=0.318, P=0.001), but not with insulin sensitivity. AGE levels decreased in subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA who received continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for three months (n=18, P=0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Serum AGE levels correlate with AHI in non-diabetic adult males. This relationship cannot be explained by insulin sensitivity. Supporting the hypothesis of a direct relationship between AHI and AGEs, AGE levels were found to decline with CPAP therapy.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Elsevier BV. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/sleep</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Sleep Medicine</relation.ispartof>
<subject.mesh>Blood Glucose - analysis</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Glycosylation End Products, Advanced - blood</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Insulin Resistance - physiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Sleep Apnea Syndromes - blood - physiopathology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - blood - physiopathology - therapy</subject.mesh>
<title>Increased serum levels of advanced glycation end-products is associated with severity of sleep disordered breathing but not insulin sensitivity in non-diabetic men with obstructive sleep apnoea.</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1016/j.sleep.2011.07.015</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>22137116</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-84355161923</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>201507</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84355161923&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>13</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>1</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>15</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>20</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000300131900005</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>Netherlands</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>10122709</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong