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Article: Investigation of a broadband duct noise control system inspired by the middle ear mechanism

TitleInvestigation of a broadband duct noise control system inspired by the middle ear mechanism
Authors
KeywordsAdded mass
Air motion
Broadband impedance transformer
Broadband noise
Cavity length
Issue Date2012
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ymssp
Citation
Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing, 2012, v. 31, p. 284–297 How to Cite?
AbstractA new duct noise control device is introduced based on the mechanism of human middle ear which functions as a compact, broadband impedance transformer between the air motion in the outer ear and the liquid motion in the inner ear. The system consists of two rigid endplates, simulating the tympanic membrane and the stapes footplate, and they are connected by a single rigid rod, simulating the overall action of the ossicular chain. These three pieces are placed in a side-branch cavity, and the whole device is called an ossicular silencer. A specific configuration is investigated numerically with a two-dimensional finite element model. Results show that broadband noise attenuation can be achieved in the very low frequency regime. Typically, two or more resonance peaks are found and the transmission loss between two neighbouring peaks is maintained at a high level. The cavity length is found to be the most crucial parameter that determines the effective frequency range of the ossicular silencer. The total cavity volume, which is a major controlling factor in most existing noise control devices, becomes less influential. The fluid medium in the enclosed cavity mainly acts like an added mass, while its stiffness effect is negligible. Simplified plane wave analysis is also conducted to reveal the mechanisms of the system resonances. The first resonance is identified as of the mass-spring system with mass contributions from both fluid and the plates, while the second one is of the Herschel-Quincke (HQ) tube resonance. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152718
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.771
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.887
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:46:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:46:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationMechanical Systems and Signal Processing, 2012, v. 31, p. 284–297en_US
dc.identifier.issn0888-3270-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152718-
dc.description.abstractA new duct noise control device is introduced based on the mechanism of human middle ear which functions as a compact, broadband impedance transformer between the air motion in the outer ear and the liquid motion in the inner ear. The system consists of two rigid endplates, simulating the tympanic membrane and the stapes footplate, and they are connected by a single rigid rod, simulating the overall action of the ossicular chain. These three pieces are placed in a side-branch cavity, and the whole device is called an ossicular silencer. A specific configuration is investigated numerically with a two-dimensional finite element model. Results show that broadband noise attenuation can be achieved in the very low frequency regime. Typically, two or more resonance peaks are found and the transmission loss between two neighbouring peaks is maintained at a high level. The cavity length is found to be the most crucial parameter that determines the effective frequency range of the ossicular silencer. The total cavity volume, which is a major controlling factor in most existing noise control devices, becomes less influential. The fluid medium in the enclosed cavity mainly acts like an added mass, while its stiffness effect is negligible. Simplified plane wave analysis is also conducted to reveal the mechanisms of the system resonances. The first resonance is identified as of the mass-spring system with mass contributions from both fluid and the plates, while the second one is of the Herschel-Quincke (HQ) tube resonance. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ymsspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMechanical Systems and Signal Processingen_US
dc.subjectAdded mass-
dc.subjectAir motion-
dc.subjectBroadband impedance transformer-
dc.subjectBroadband noise-
dc.subjectCavity length-
dc.titleInvestigation of a broadband duct noise control system inspired by the middle ear mechanismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, C: cqwang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHuang, L: lixi@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHuang, L=rp00119en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ymssp.2012.02.016-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862799024-
dc.identifier.hkuros201637en_US
dc.identifier.volume31en_US
dc.identifier.spage284–297en_US
dc.identifier.epage284–297en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1096-1216-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000305842600019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.citeulike10727989-

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