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Article: Singapore’s Culture War over Section 377A: Through the Lens of Public Choice and MultiLingual Research

TitleSingapore’s Culture War over Section 377A: Through the Lens of Public Choice and MultiLingual Research
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0897-6546
Citation
Law and Social Inquiry, 2013, v. 38 n. 1, p. 106-137 How to Cite?
AbstractThe 2007 debate over the retention of Singapore’s male sodomy law provision set off a vigorous and passionate public debate reminiscent of the US culture war. However, the Singapore government’s final decision reflects an interesting compromise. The law was retained, but its moral content was severely curtailed. This article critically examines this episode and explores the political dynamics driving the compromise. Enriching public choice theory on interest group capture, this article argues that the ruling party’s political dominance coupled with limited but real political competition is surprisingly effective in aligning the government’s position with the preference of the majority despite concerted pressure from well-mobilized minority interest groups. Current legal scholarly work on this debate has focused on the “vigorous debate” in the English-language forums. In this article, the examination of the contemporaneous discourse in Chinese and Malay newspapers enables a more accurate and comprehensive appreciation of this culture war episode. © 2012 American Bar Foundation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152681
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.861
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.570
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-16T09:46:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-16T09:46:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationLaw and Social Inquiry, 2013, v. 38 n. 1, p. 106-137en_US
dc.identifier.issn0897-6546-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152681-
dc.description.abstractThe 2007 debate over the retention of Singapore’s male sodomy law provision set off a vigorous and passionate public debate reminiscent of the US culture war. However, the Singapore government’s final decision reflects an interesting compromise. The law was retained, but its moral content was severely curtailed. This article critically examines this episode and explores the political dynamics driving the compromise. Enriching public choice theory on interest group capture, this article argues that the ruling party’s political dominance coupled with limited but real political competition is surprisingly effective in aligning the government’s position with the preference of the majority despite concerted pressure from well-mobilized minority interest groups. Current legal scholarly work on this debate has focused on the “vigorous debate” in the English-language forums. In this article, the examination of the contemporaneous discourse in Chinese and Malay newspapers enables a more accurate and comprehensive appreciation of this culture war episode. © 2012 American Bar Foundation.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0897-6546en_US
dc.relation.ispartofLaw and Social Inquiryen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.titleSingapore’s Culture War over Section 377A: Through the Lens of Public Choice and MultiLingual Researchen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, J: jianlin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, J=rp01530en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1747-4469.2012.01297.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84873992822-
dc.identifier.hkuros200464en_US
dc.identifier.volume38-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage106-
dc.identifier.epage137-
dc.identifier.eissn1747-4469-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000315102000005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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