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Article: RNA interference and HIV-1: hits and misses

TitleRNA interference and HIV-1: hits and misses
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-hivandaids.com/
Citation
Current opinion in HIV and AIDS, 2006, v. 1 n. 3, p. 208-211 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: RNA interference is a type of nucleic-acid-based immunity used by cells to restrict transposons, transgenes and viruses. The RNA interference machinery targets long double-stranded RNAs to produce short RNAs that arm cellular ribonucleases to degrade foreign RNAs in a sequence-specific manner. Despite this defense, many viruses with RNA genomes, such as HIV-1, replicate seemingly unrestricted in cells. This suggests that viruses may have evolved counter-strategems that negate the host's RNA interference. We review the complex point-counterpoint RNA interference interplays between the human cells and HIV-1. RECENT FINDINGS: RNA interference functions in human cells to restrict viral replication. Recent findings suggest that HIV-1 can evade cellular RNA interference in several ways. First, the virus can mutate its sequence to evade sequence-specific targeting by RNA interference. Second, HIV-1 encodes a viral Tat protein that can partially suppress the cell's RNA interference processing machinery. Finally, HIV-1 encodes a small RNA decoy, TAR, which can sequester a cellular protein named TAR RNA binding protein. The recent discovery that TAR RNA binding protein is a required cofactor for Dicer to process microRNA and small interfering RNA suggests that TAR RNA is another moiety used by HIV-1 to defeat RNA interference. SUMMARY: We discuss stratagems used by HIV-1 and other viruses to defeat the cells' antiviral small interfering RNA/microRNA defenses. We review how viruses might control and regulate host genes by encoding viral microRNA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152579
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.378
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.613
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBennasser, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, ML-
dc.contributor.authorBenkirane, M-
dc.contributor.authorJeang, KT-
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-12T01:52:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-12T01:52:35Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationCurrent opinion in HIV and AIDS, 2006, v. 1 n. 3, p. 208-211-
dc.identifier.issn1746-630X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152579-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: RNA interference is a type of nucleic-acid-based immunity used by cells to restrict transposons, transgenes and viruses. The RNA interference machinery targets long double-stranded RNAs to produce short RNAs that arm cellular ribonucleases to degrade foreign RNAs in a sequence-specific manner. Despite this defense, many viruses with RNA genomes, such as HIV-1, replicate seemingly unrestricted in cells. This suggests that viruses may have evolved counter-strategems that negate the host's RNA interference. We review the complex point-counterpoint RNA interference interplays between the human cells and HIV-1. RECENT FINDINGS: RNA interference functions in human cells to restrict viral replication. Recent findings suggest that HIV-1 can evade cellular RNA interference in several ways. First, the virus can mutate its sequence to evade sequence-specific targeting by RNA interference. Second, HIV-1 encodes a viral Tat protein that can partially suppress the cell's RNA interference processing machinery. Finally, HIV-1 encodes a small RNA decoy, TAR, which can sequester a cellular protein named TAR RNA binding protein. The recent discovery that TAR RNA binding protein is a required cofactor for Dicer to process microRNA and small interfering RNA suggests that TAR RNA is another moiety used by HIV-1 to defeat RNA interference. SUMMARY: We discuss stratagems used by HIV-1 and other viruses to defeat the cells' antiviral small interfering RNA/microRNA defenses. We review how viruses might control and regulate host genes by encoding viral microRNA.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.co-hivandaids.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofCurrent opinion in HIV and AIDS-
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Current opinion in HIV and AIDS, 2006, v. 1 n. 3, p. 208-211-
dc.titleRNA interference and HIV-1: hits and missesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, ML: pmlyeung@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.COH.0000221593.49412.56-
dc.identifier.pmid19372810-
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage208-
dc.identifier.epage211-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000208417200004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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