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Article: End-Permian to mid-Triassic termination of the accretionary processes of the southern Altaids: Implications for the geodynamic evolution, Phanerozoic continental growth, and metallogeny of Central Asia

TitleEnd-Permian to mid-Triassic termination of the accretionary processes of the southern Altaids: Implications for the geodynamic evolution, Phanerozoic continental growth, and metallogeny of Central Asia
Authors
KeywordsAccretionary Process
Central Asia
Continental Growth
End-Permian To Mid-Triassic Termination
Geodynamic Evolution
Metallogeny
Southern Altaids
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00531/index.htm
Citation
International Journal Of Earth Sciences, 2009, v. 98 n. 6, p. 1189-1217 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Altaids is one of the largest accretionary orogenic collages in the world with the highest rate of Phanerozoic continental growth and significant metallogenic importance. It is widely accepted that subduction-related orogenesis of the Altaids started in the late Precambrian and gradually migrated southward (present coordinates). However, it is uncertain when and how the building of the Altaids was finally completed. Based on structural geology, geochemical, geochronological, and paleomagnetic data, this paper presents late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic accretionary tectonics of two key areas, North Xinjiang in the west and Inner Mongolia in the east, together with neighboring Mongolia. The late Paleozoic tectonics of North Xinjiang and adjacent areas were characterized by continuous southward accretion along the wide southern active margin of Siberia and its final amalgamation with the passive margin of Tarim, which may have lasted to the end-Permian to early/mid-Triassic. In contrast, in Inner Mongolia and adjacent areas two wide accretionary wedges developed along the southern active margin of Siberia and the northern active margin of the North China craton, which may have lasted to the mid-Triassic. The final products of the long-lived accretionary processes in the southern Altaids include late Paleozoic to Permian arcs, late Paleozoic to mid-Triassic accretionary wedges composed of radiolarian cherts, pillow lavas, and ophiolitic fragments, and high-pressure/ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks. Permian Alaskan-type zoned mafic-ultramafic complexes intruded along some major faults of the Tien Shan. We define a new Tarim suture zone immediately north of the Tarim craton that is probably now buried below the Tien Shan as a result of northward subduction of the Tarim block in the Cenozoic. The docking of the Tarim and North China cratons against the southern active margin of Siberia in the end-Permian to mid-Triassic resulted in the final closure of the Paleoasian Ocean and terminated the accretionary orogenesis of the southern Altaids in this part of Central Asia. This complex geodynamic evolution led to formation of giant metal deposits in Central Asia and to substantial continental growth. © Springer-Verlag 2009.
DescriptionThis journal issue entitled: Geodynamic evolution of Central Asia in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152517
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.133
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.992
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Major State Basic Research Development Program of China2007CB411307
National 305 Project2007BAB25B04
National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars40725009
Funding Information:

Jinyi Li, Jun Gao, Laicheng Miao, Xiaoping Long, Keda Cai, and Kenny Wong are acknowledged for collaboration and discussions. We sincerely appreciate the thorough comments, suggestions, and criticisms of four formal Journal reviewers, Cari Johnson, Dick Glen, and two anonymous ones, and of guest-editor Alfred Kroner, which substantially improved the manuscript, as did a final survey of Dick Glen and an anonymous referee, for all of which the authors are sincerely grateful. This study was financially supported by funds from the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (2007CB411307), National 305 Project (2007BAB25B04), and the National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars (40725009). This paper is a contribution to the ILP (ERAs and Topo-Central Asia) and IGCP 480 projects.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXiao, WJen_US
dc.contributor.authorWindley, BFen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuang, BCen_US
dc.contributor.authorHan, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, HLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, JLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:40:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Earth Sciences, 2009, v. 98 n. 6, p. 1189-1217en_US
dc.identifier.issn1437-3254en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152517-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue entitled: Geodynamic evolution of Central Asia in the Paleozoic and Mesozoic-
dc.description.abstractThe Altaids is one of the largest accretionary orogenic collages in the world with the highest rate of Phanerozoic continental growth and significant metallogenic importance. It is widely accepted that subduction-related orogenesis of the Altaids started in the late Precambrian and gradually migrated southward (present coordinates). However, it is uncertain when and how the building of the Altaids was finally completed. Based on structural geology, geochemical, geochronological, and paleomagnetic data, this paper presents late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic accretionary tectonics of two key areas, North Xinjiang in the west and Inner Mongolia in the east, together with neighboring Mongolia. The late Paleozoic tectonics of North Xinjiang and adjacent areas were characterized by continuous southward accretion along the wide southern active margin of Siberia and its final amalgamation with the passive margin of Tarim, which may have lasted to the end-Permian to early/mid-Triassic. In contrast, in Inner Mongolia and adjacent areas two wide accretionary wedges developed along the southern active margin of Siberia and the northern active margin of the North China craton, which may have lasted to the mid-Triassic. The final products of the long-lived accretionary processes in the southern Altaids include late Paleozoic to Permian arcs, late Paleozoic to mid-Triassic accretionary wedges composed of radiolarian cherts, pillow lavas, and ophiolitic fragments, and high-pressure/ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic rocks. Permian Alaskan-type zoned mafic-ultramafic complexes intruded along some major faults of the Tien Shan. We define a new Tarim suture zone immediately north of the Tarim craton that is probably now buried below the Tien Shan as a result of northward subduction of the Tarim block in the Cenozoic. The docking of the Tarim and North China cratons against the southern active margin of Siberia in the end-Permian to mid-Triassic resulted in the final closure of the Paleoasian Ocean and terminated the accretionary orogenesis of the southern Altaids in this part of Central Asia. This complex geodynamic evolution led to formation of giant metal deposits in Central Asia and to substantial continental growth. © Springer-Verlag 2009.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00531/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Earth Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAccretionary Processen_US
dc.subjectCentral Asiaen_US
dc.subjectContinental Growthen_US
dc.subjectEnd-Permian To Mid-Triassic Terminationen_US
dc.subjectGeodynamic Evolutionen_US
dc.subjectMetallogenyen_US
dc.subjectSouthern Altaidsen_US
dc.titleEnd-Permian to mid-Triassic termination of the accretionary processes of the southern Altaids: Implications for the geodynamic evolution, Phanerozoic continental growth, and metallogeny of Central Asiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSun, M:minsun@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00780en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00531-008-0407-zen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69849096094en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69849096094&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume98en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1189en_US
dc.identifier.epage1217en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269376400002-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiao, WJ=7202456615en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWindley, BF=7006726637en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, BC=37101657000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHan, CM=35794513200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuan, C=35241599200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, HL=8620950800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, M=25932315800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, S=7404509994en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, JL=26643194200en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3901734-

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