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Article: Adaptive density estimation using an orthogonal series for global illumination

TitleAdaptive density estimation using an orthogonal series for global illumination
Authors
KeywordsDensity Estimation
Monte Carlo Simulation
Photon-Tracing
Probability And Statistics
Issue Date2005
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cag
Citation
Computers And Graphics (Pergamon), 2005, v. 29 n. 5, p. 745-762 How to Cite?
AbstractIn Monte-Carlo photon-tracing methods energy-carrying particles are traced in an environment to generate hit points on object surfaces for simulating global illumination. The surface illumination can be reconstructed from particle hit points by solving a density estimation problem using an orthogonal series. The appropriate number of terms of an orthogonal series used for approximating surface illumination depends on the numbers of hit points (i.e. the number of samples) as well as illumination discontinuity (i.e. shadow boundaries) on a surface. Existing photon-tracing methods based on orthogonal series density estimation use a pre-specified or fixed number m of terms of an orthogonal series; this results in undesirable visual artifacts, i.e. either near-constant shading across a surface which conceals the true illumination variation when m is very small or excessive illumination oscillation when m is very large. On the other hand, interactive user specification of the number of terms for different surface patches is inefficient and inaccurate, and thus is not a practical solution. In this paper an algorithm is presented for automatically determining on the fly the optimal number of terms to be used in an orthogonal series in order to reconstruct surface illumination from surface hit points. When the optimal number of terms required is too high due to illumination discontinuity of a surface, a heuristic scheme is used to subdivide the surface along the discontinuity boundary into some smaller patches, called sub-patches, so as to allow a smaller number of terms in the orthogonal series to optimally represent illumination on these sub-patches. Experimental results are presented to show that the new method improves upon other existing orthogonal series-based density estimation methods used for global illumination in both running time and memory requirements. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152327
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.12
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.514
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:37:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:37:13Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationComputers And Graphics (Pergamon), 2005, v. 29 n. 5, p. 745-762en_US
dc.identifier.issn0097-8493en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152327-
dc.description.abstractIn Monte-Carlo photon-tracing methods energy-carrying particles are traced in an environment to generate hit points on object surfaces for simulating global illumination. The surface illumination can be reconstructed from particle hit points by solving a density estimation problem using an orthogonal series. The appropriate number of terms of an orthogonal series used for approximating surface illumination depends on the numbers of hit points (i.e. the number of samples) as well as illumination discontinuity (i.e. shadow boundaries) on a surface. Existing photon-tracing methods based on orthogonal series density estimation use a pre-specified or fixed number m of terms of an orthogonal series; this results in undesirable visual artifacts, i.e. either near-constant shading across a surface which conceals the true illumination variation when m is very small or excessive illumination oscillation when m is very large. On the other hand, interactive user specification of the number of terms for different surface patches is inefficient and inaccurate, and thus is not a practical solution. In this paper an algorithm is presented for automatically determining on the fly the optimal number of terms to be used in an orthogonal series in order to reconstruct surface illumination from surface hit points. When the optimal number of terms required is too high due to illumination discontinuity of a surface, a heuristic scheme is used to subdivide the surface along the discontinuity boundary into some smaller patches, called sub-patches, so as to allow a smaller number of terms in the orthogonal series to optimally represent illumination on these sub-patches. Experimental results are presented to show that the new method improves upon other existing orthogonal series-based density estimation methods used for global illumination in both running time and memory requirements. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cagen_US
dc.relation.ispartofComputers and Graphics (Pergamon)en_US
dc.subjectDensity Estimationen_US
dc.subjectMonte Carlo Simulationen_US
dc.subjectPhoton-Tracingen_US
dc.subjectProbability And Statisticsen_US
dc.titleAdaptive density estimation using an orthogonal series for global illuminationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, W:wenping@cs.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, W=rp00186en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cag.2005.08.012en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-27444444612en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros141116-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-27444444612&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage745en_US
dc.identifier.epage762en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233537000011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, KW=37096556700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, W=35147101600en_US

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