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Conference Paper: Microbial distribution in UASB granules and its resulting effects

TitleMicrobial distribution in UASB granules and its resulting effects
Authors
KeywordsAnaerobic
Biogranule
Distribution
Microbial
Syntrophic
Thermodynamics
Issue Date2000
PublisherI W A Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iwapublishing.com/template.cfm?name=iwapwst
Citation
Water Science And Technology, 2000, v. 42 n. 12, p. 201-208 How to Cite?
AbstractMicroscopic (SEM and TEM) examinations of biogranules sampled from various UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket) reactors indicated that microbes are densely packed. The microbial distribution is strongly dependent upon the degradation thermodynamics and kinetics of individual substrates. Biogranules degrading carbohydrates exhibited typically a layered distribution with a surface layer populated with hydrolytic/fermentative acidogens, a mid-layer comprising syntrophic colonies and an interior comprising acetotrophic methanogens. On the other hand, those substrates having a rate-limiting hydrolytic/fermentative step did not exhibit any layered pattern; instead, bacteria were interwined and distributed evenly. These observations have two implications. Biogranules are developed through evolution instead of random aggregation of suspended microbes. Furthermore, biogranules should be less vulnerable to the changes of mixed liquor condition, because the large majority of microbes inside the biogranules are shielded from the hostile mixed liquor environment. The latter is supported by experimental evidence that biogranules are more resistant than suspended sludge to the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide, heavy metals and aromatic pollutants in wastewater. | Microscopic (SEM and TEM) examinations of biogranules sampled from various UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket) reactors indicated that microbes are densely packed. The microbial distribution is strongly dependent upon the degradation thermodynamics and kinetics of individual substrates. Biogranules degrading carbohydrates exhibited typically a layered distribution with a surface layer populated with hydrolytic/fermentative acidogens, a mid-layer comprising syntrophic colonies and an interior comprising acetotrophic methanogens. On the other hand, those substrates having a rate-limiting hydrolytic/fermentative step did not exhibit any layered pattern; instead, bacteria were interwined and distributed evenly. These observations have two implications. Biogranules are developed through evolution instead of random aggregation of suspended microbes. Furthermore, biogranules should be less vulnerable to the changes of mixed liquor condition, because the large majority of microbes inside the biogranules are shielded from the hostile mixed liquor environment. The latter is supported by experimental evidence that biogranules are more resistant than suspended sludge to the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide, heavy metals and aromatic pollutants in wastewater.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152114
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.064
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.469
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFang, HHPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:35:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:35:15Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationWater Science And Technology, 2000, v. 42 n. 12, p. 201-208en_US
dc.identifier.issn0273-1223en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/152114-
dc.description.abstractMicroscopic (SEM and TEM) examinations of biogranules sampled from various UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket) reactors indicated that microbes are densely packed. The microbial distribution is strongly dependent upon the degradation thermodynamics and kinetics of individual substrates. Biogranules degrading carbohydrates exhibited typically a layered distribution with a surface layer populated with hydrolytic/fermentative acidogens, a mid-layer comprising syntrophic colonies and an interior comprising acetotrophic methanogens. On the other hand, those substrates having a rate-limiting hydrolytic/fermentative step did not exhibit any layered pattern; instead, bacteria were interwined and distributed evenly. These observations have two implications. Biogranules are developed through evolution instead of random aggregation of suspended microbes. Furthermore, biogranules should be less vulnerable to the changes of mixed liquor condition, because the large majority of microbes inside the biogranules are shielded from the hostile mixed liquor environment. The latter is supported by experimental evidence that biogranules are more resistant than suspended sludge to the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide, heavy metals and aromatic pollutants in wastewater. | Microscopic (SEM and TEM) examinations of biogranules sampled from various UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket) reactors indicated that microbes are densely packed. The microbial distribution is strongly dependent upon the degradation thermodynamics and kinetics of individual substrates. Biogranules degrading carbohydrates exhibited typically a layered distribution with a surface layer populated with hydrolytic/fermentative acidogens, a mid-layer comprising syntrophic colonies and an interior comprising acetotrophic methanogens. On the other hand, those substrates having a rate-limiting hydrolytic/fermentative step did not exhibit any layered pattern; instead, bacteria were interwined and distributed evenly. These observations have two implications. Biogranules are developed through evolution instead of random aggregation of suspended microbes. Furthermore, biogranules should be less vulnerable to the changes of mixed liquor condition, because the large majority of microbes inside the biogranules are shielded from the hostile mixed liquor environment. The latter is supported by experimental evidence that biogranules are more resistant than suspended sludge to the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide, heavy metals and aromatic pollutants in wastewater.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherI W A Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iwapublishing.com/template.cfm?name=iwapwsten_US
dc.relation.ispartofWater Science and Technologyen_US
dc.subjectAnaerobicen_US
dc.subjectBiogranuleen_US
dc.subjectDistributionen_US
dc.subjectMicrobialen_US
dc.subjectSyntrophicen_US
dc.subjectThermodynamicsen_US
dc.titleMicrobial distribution in UASB granules and its resulting effectsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailFang, HHP:hrechef@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFang, HHP=rp00115en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034522302en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034522302&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage201en_US
dc.identifier.epage208en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, HHP=7402542625en_US

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