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Conference Paper: Efficient key integrity verification for quantum cryptography using combinatorial group testing

TitleEfficient key integrity verification for quantum cryptography using combinatorial group testing
Authors
KeywordsQuantum cryptography
Key integrity
Combinatorial group testing
Shifted transversal design
Issue Date2010
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedings
Citation
The 2010 SPIE Conference on Defense, Security, and Sensing, Orlando, FL., 5 April 2010. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, v. 7702, p. 77020F-1 - 77020F-9 How to Cite?
AbstractIn quantum cryptography, the key can be directly distributed to the communicating parties through the communication channel. The security is guaranteed by the quantum properties of the channel. However, the transmitted key may contain errors due to the noise of the channel. Key integrity verification is an indispensable step in quantum cryptography and becomes an important problem in higher speed systems. Computing only one hash value for the key string does not provide an effective solution as it may lead to dropping all the bits once the hash values on both sides do not agree. In this paper, we introduce a new idea of using the technique of combinatorial group testing, which seems to be an unrelated topic, to design a scheme to identify the error bits to avoid dropping all the bits. Our scheme can precisely locate the error bits if the number of error bits is within the maximum set by the scheme while the overhead is insignificant based on our experiments (additional bits: 0.1% of the key; time for computing the hash values: 16ms; verification time: 22 ms). Also, even if the number of error bits is higher than the maximum set by the scheme, only some correct bits may be misclassified as error bits but not the vice versa. The results show that we can still keep the majority of the correct bits (e.g. the bits discarded due to misclassification is only 5% of the whole string even if the number of error bits is 10 times of the maximum). © 2010 SPIE.
DescriptionQuantum Information and Computation VIII 77020F (April 23, 2010)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151970
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, ZLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, CKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:31:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:31:41Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2010 SPIE Conference on Defense, Security, and Sensing, Orlando, FL., 5 April 2010. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, v. 7702, p. 77020F-1 - 77020F-9en_US
dc.identifier.issn0277-786Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151970-
dc.descriptionQuantum Information and Computation VIII 77020F (April 23, 2010)-
dc.description.abstractIn quantum cryptography, the key can be directly distributed to the communicating parties through the communication channel. The security is guaranteed by the quantum properties of the channel. However, the transmitted key may contain errors due to the noise of the channel. Key integrity verification is an indispensable step in quantum cryptography and becomes an important problem in higher speed systems. Computing only one hash value for the key string does not provide an effective solution as it may lead to dropping all the bits once the hash values on both sides do not agree. In this paper, we introduce a new idea of using the technique of combinatorial group testing, which seems to be an unrelated topic, to design a scheme to identify the error bits to avoid dropping all the bits. Our scheme can precisely locate the error bits if the number of error bits is within the maximum set by the scheme while the overhead is insignificant based on our experiments (additional bits: 0.1% of the key; time for computing the hash values: 16ms; verification time: 22 ms). Also, even if the number of error bits is higher than the maximum set by the scheme, only some correct bits may be misclassified as error bits but not the vice versa. The results show that we can still keep the majority of the correct bits (e.g. the bits discarded due to misclassification is only 5% of the whole string even if the number of error bits is 10 times of the maximum). © 2010 SPIE.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedingsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineeringen_US
dc.rightsProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Copyright © Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).-
dc.rightsCopyright 2010. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectQuantum cryptographyen_US
dc.subjectKey integrityen_US
dc.subjectCombinatorial group testingen_US
dc.subjectShifted transversal designen_US
dc.titleEfficient key integrity verification for quantum cryptography using combinatorial group testingen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailFang, J: jbfang@cs.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJiang, ZL: ljiang@cs.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, SM: smyiu@cs.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CK: hui@cs.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, Z: zcli@cs.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, SM=rp00207en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CK=rp00120en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.853234en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953765723en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros182460-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953765723&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume7702en_US
dc.identifier.spage77020F-1-
dc.identifier.epage77020F-9-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285050700012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.description.otherThe 2010 SPIE Conference on Defense, Security, and Sensing, Orlando, FL., 5 April 2010. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, v. 7702, p. 77020F-1 - 77020F-9-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Z=7409086435en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LCK=8905728300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, SM=7003282240en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, ZL=24344329800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, J=36132767400en_US

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