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Article: Household transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1): a systematic review and meta-analysis

TitleHousehold transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1): a systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 4, p. 531-542 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, household transmission studies were implemented to better understand the characteristics of the transmission of the novel virus in a confined setting. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess and summarize the findings of these studies. We identified 27 articles, around half of which reported studies conducted in May and June 2009. RESULTS: In 13 of the 27 studies (48%) that collected respiratory specimens from household contacts, point estimates of the risk of secondary infection ranged from 3% to 38%, with substantial heterogeneity. Meta-regression analyses revealed that a part of the heterogeneity reflected varying case ascertainment and study designs. The estimates of symptomatic secondary infection risk, based on 20 studies identifying febrile acute respiratory illness among household contacts, also showed substantial variability, with point estimates ranging from 4% to 37%. CONCLUSIONS: Transmission of the 2009 pandemic virus in households appeared to vary among countries and settings, with differences in estimates of the secondary infection risk also partly due to differences in study designs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151772
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics the National Institute of General Medical SciencesU54 GM088558
Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee of Hong KongAoE/M12/06
JST PRESTO
MedImmune Inc.
CSL Biotherapies
Roche
Funding Information:

This work received financial support from the Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (grant no. U54 GM088558), and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee of Hong Kong (grant no. AoE/M12/06). HN is supported by the JST PRESTO program. BJC has received research funding from MedImmune Inc. HAK has received funding from CSL Biotherapies. DKMI has received research funding from Roche. The authors reported no other financial interests related to this research.

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, LLHen_US
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:28:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:28:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 4, p. 531-542en_US
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151772-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: During the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, household transmission studies were implemented to better understand the characteristics of the transmission of the novel virus in a confined setting. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess and summarize the findings of these studies. We identified 27 articles, around half of which reported studies conducted in May and June 2009. RESULTS: In 13 of the 27 studies (48%) that collected respiratory specimens from household contacts, point estimates of the risk of secondary infection ranged from 3% to 38%, with substantial heterogeneity. Meta-regression analyses revealed that a part of the heterogeneity reflected varying case ascertainment and study designs. The estimates of symptomatic secondary infection risk, based on 20 studies identifying febrile acute respiratory illness among household contacts, also showed substantial variability, with point estimates ranging from 4% to 37%. CONCLUSIONS: Transmission of the 2009 pandemic virus in households appeared to vary among countries and settings, with differences in estimates of the secondary infection risk also partly due to differences in study designs.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_US
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Epidemiology, 2012, v. 23 n. 4, p. 531-542-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshContact Tracing-
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission-
dc.subject.meshPandemics-
dc.titleHousehold transmission of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1): a systematic review and meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H: nishiura@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/EDE.0b013e31825588b8en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22561117-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3367058-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862151249-
dc.identifier.hkuros200256-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage531-
dc.identifier.epage542-
dc.identifier.eissn1531-5487-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304916900005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=55201576300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIp, DKM=55201503700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKelly, H=55201620500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=55201615000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, LLH=55201469400en_US

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