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Article: Influenza serological studies to inform public health action: Best practices to optimise timing, quality and reporting

TitleInfluenza serological studies to inform public health action: Best practices to optimise timing, quality and reporting
Authors
KeywordsAntibodies
Influenza
Pandemic
Public Health Response
Serological Studies
Issue Date2013
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1
Citation
Influenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2013, v. 7 n. 2, p. 211-224 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Serological studies can detect infection with a novel influenza virus in the absence of symptoms or positive virology, providing useful information on infection that goes beyond the estimates from epidemiological, clinical and virological data. During the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic, an impressive number of detailed serological studies were performed, yet the majority of serological data were available only after the first wave of infection. This limited the ability to estimate the transmissibility and severity of this novel infection, and the variability in methodology and reporting limited the ability to compare and combine the serological data. Objectives To identify best practices for conduct and standardisation of serological studies on outbreak and pandemic influenza to inform public policy. Methods/Setting An international meeting was held in February 2011 in Ottawa, Canada, to foster the consensus for greater standardisation of influenza serological studies. Results Best practices for serological investigations of influenza epidemiology include the following: classification of studies as pre-pandemic, outbreak, pandemic or inter-pandemic with a clearly identified objective; use of international serum standards for laboratory assays; cohort and cross-sectional study designs with common standards for data collection; use of serum banks to improve sampling capacity; and potential for linkage of serological, clinical and epidemiological data. Advance planning for outbreak studies would enable a rapid and coordinated response; inclusion of serological studies in pandemic plans should be considered. Conclusions Optimising the quality, comparability and combinability of influenza serological studies will provide important data upon emergence of a novel or variant influenza virus to inform public health action. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151771
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.378
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.570
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaurie, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorHuston, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorRiley, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorKatz, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWillison, DJen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, JSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMounts, AWen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoschler, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorVandemaele, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorBroberg, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Kerkhove, MDen_US
dc.contributor.authorNicoll, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:28:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:28:10Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationInfluenza And Other Respiratory Viruses, 2013, v. 7 n. 2, p. 211-224en_US
dc.identifier.issn1750-2640en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151771-
dc.description.abstractBackground Serological studies can detect infection with a novel influenza virus in the absence of symptoms or positive virology, providing useful information on infection that goes beyond the estimates from epidemiological, clinical and virological data. During the 2009 A(H1N1) pandemic, an impressive number of detailed serological studies were performed, yet the majority of serological data were available only after the first wave of infection. This limited the ability to estimate the transmissibility and severity of this novel infection, and the variability in methodology and reporting limited the ability to compare and combine the serological data. Objectives To identify best practices for conduct and standardisation of serological studies on outbreak and pandemic influenza to inform public policy. Methods/Setting An international meeting was held in February 2011 in Ottawa, Canada, to foster the consensus for greater standardisation of influenza serological studies. Results Best practices for serological investigations of influenza epidemiology include the following: classification of studies as pre-pandemic, outbreak, pandemic or inter-pandemic with a clearly identified objective; use of international serum standards for laboratory assays; cohort and cross-sectional study designs with common standards for data collection; use of serum banks to improve sampling capacity; and potential for linkage of serological, clinical and epidemiological data. Advance planning for outbreak studies would enable a rapid and coordinated response; inclusion of serological studies in pandemic plans should be considered. Conclusions Optimising the quality, comparability and combinability of influenza serological studies will provide important data upon emergence of a novel or variant influenza virus to inform public health action. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1750-2640&site=1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInfluenza and other Respiratory Virusesen_US
dc.subjectAntibodiesen_US
dc.subjectInfluenzaen_US
dc.subjectPandemicen_US
dc.subjectPublic Health Responseen_US
dc.subjectSerological Studiesen_US
dc.titleInfluenza serological studies to inform public health action: Best practices to optimise timing, quality and reportingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailRiley, S:sriley@hkucc.hku.hk, steven.riley@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityRiley, S=rp00511en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1750-2659.2012.0370a.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid22548725-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84873742115en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000314921500013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaurie, KL=6602569925en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuston, P=7005469692en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRiley, S=7102619416en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKatz, JM=54924984800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWillison, DJ=7003725965en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, JS=55199435400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMounts, AW=6603380829en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoschler, K=24402410800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMiller, E=54980677400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVandemaele, K=55200168000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBroberg, E=6603909215en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Kerkhove, MD=15761388700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNicoll, A=7102835843en_US

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