File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Swine influenza surveillance in East and Southeast Asia: a systematic review

TitleSwine influenza surveillance in East and Southeast Asia: a systematic review
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=AHR
Citation
Animal Health Research Reviews, 2011, v. 12 n. 2, p. 213-223 How to Cite?
AbstractEast and Southeast Asia are important pig- and poultry-producing areas, where the majority of production takes place on small-scale farms with low biosecurity levels. This systematic review synthesizes data on swine influenza virology, serology and epidemiology in East and Southeast Asia. A total of 77 research articles, literature reviews and conference papers were selected and analyzed from 510 references retrieved from PubMed and ISI Web of KnowledgeSM. The number of published articles increased in the last 3 years, which may be attributed to improvement in monitoring and/or a better promotion of surveillance data. Nevertheless, large inequalities in surveillance and research among countries are underlined. Virological results represent the largest part of published data, while the serological and epidemiological features of swine influenza in East and Southeast Asia remain poorly described. The literature shows that there have been several emergences of swine influenza in the region, and also considerable evidence of multiple introductions of North American and avian-like European strains. Furthermore, several avian-origin strains are isolated from pigs, including H5 and H9 subtypes. However, their low seroprevalence in swine also shows that pigs remain poorly infected by these subtypes. We conclude that sero-epidemioligical investigations have been neglected, and that they may help to improve virological surveillance. Inter- and intra-continental surveillance of gene flows will benefit the region. Greater investment is needed in swine influenza surveillance, to improve our knowledge of circulating strains as well as the epidemiology and disease burden in the region.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151767
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.5
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.838

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTrevennec, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeyre, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBaudon, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMartineau, GPen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoger, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:28:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:28:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnimal Health Research Reviews, 2011, v. 12 n. 2, p. 213-223en_US
dc.identifier.issn1466-2523en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151767-
dc.description.abstractEast and Southeast Asia are important pig- and poultry-producing areas, where the majority of production takes place on small-scale farms with low biosecurity levels. This systematic review synthesizes data on swine influenza virology, serology and epidemiology in East and Southeast Asia. A total of 77 research articles, literature reviews and conference papers were selected and analyzed from 510 references retrieved from PubMed and ISI Web of KnowledgeSM. The number of published articles increased in the last 3 years, which may be attributed to improvement in monitoring and/or a better promotion of surveillance data. Nevertheless, large inequalities in surveillance and research among countries are underlined. Virological results represent the largest part of published data, while the serological and epidemiological features of swine influenza in East and Southeast Asia remain poorly described. The literature shows that there have been several emergences of swine influenza in the region, and also considerable evidence of multiple introductions of North American and avian-like European strains. Furthermore, several avian-origin strains are isolated from pigs, including H5 and H9 subtypes. However, their low seroprevalence in swine also shows that pigs remain poorly infected by these subtypes. We conclude that sero-epidemioligical investigations have been neglected, and that they may help to improve virological surveillance. Inter- and intra-continental surveillance of gene flows will benefit the region. Greater investment is needed in swine influenza surveillance, to improve our knowledge of circulating strains as well as the epidemiology and disease burden in the region.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=AHR-
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Health Research Reviewsen_US
dc.rightsAnimal Health Research Reviews. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAsia, Southeastern - epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A virus - classification - isolation and purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention and control - transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleSwine influenza surveillance in East and Southeast Asia: a systematic reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1466252311000181-
dc.identifier.pmid22123276-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858765441en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros198566-
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage213en_US
dc.identifier.epage223en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoger, F=7006292417en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMartineau, GP=7004913587en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaudon, E=55127446800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeyre, M=6701524287en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTrevennec, K=55128805900en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats