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Article: Air pollution and admissions for acute lower respiratory infections in young children of Ho Chi Minh City

TitleAir pollution and admissions for acute lower respiratory infections in young children of Ho Chi Minh City
Authors
KeywordsAir Pollution
Alri
Children's Health
Vietnam
Issue Date2013
Citation
Air Quality, Atmosphere And Health, 2013, v. 6 n. 1, p. 167-179 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study assessed the effects of exposure to air pollution on hospitalization for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) among children under 5 years of age in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) from 2003 to 2005. Case-crossover analyses with time-stratified selection of control periods were conducted using daily admissions for pneumonia and bronchiolitis and daily, citywide averages of PM 10, NO 2, SO 2, and O 3 (8-h maximum average) estimated from the local air quality monitoring network. Increased concentrations of NO 2 and SO 2 were associated with increased admissions in the dry season (November to April), with excess risks of 8.50% (95%CI 0.80-16.79) and 5.85% (95%CI 0.44-11.55), respectively. PM 10 could also be associated with increased admissions in the dry season, but high correlation between PM 10 and NO 2 (0.78) limits our ability to distinguish between PM 10 and NO 2 effects. In the rainy season (May-October), negative associations between pollutants and admissions were observed. Results of this first study of the health effects of air pollution in HCMC support the presence of an association between combustion-source pollution and increased ALRI admissions. ALRI admissions were generally positively associated with ambient levels of PM 10, NO 2, and SO 2 during the dry season, but not the rainy season. Negative results in the rainy season could be driven by residual confounding present from May to October. Preliminary exploratory analyses suggested that seasonal differences in the prevalence of viral causes of ALRI could be driving the observed differences in effects by season. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151751
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.324
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.706
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMehta, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorNgo, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Dzung, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQen_US
dc.contributor.authorDan, VXen_US
dc.contributor.authorTuan, NDen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiang, LTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationAir Quality, Atmosphere And Health, 2013, v. 6 n. 1, p. 167-179en_US
dc.identifier.issn1873-9318en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151751-
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the effects of exposure to air pollution on hospitalization for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) among children under 5 years of age in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) from 2003 to 2005. Case-crossover analyses with time-stratified selection of control periods were conducted using daily admissions for pneumonia and bronchiolitis and daily, citywide averages of PM 10, NO 2, SO 2, and O 3 (8-h maximum average) estimated from the local air quality monitoring network. Increased concentrations of NO 2 and SO 2 were associated with increased admissions in the dry season (November to April), with excess risks of 8.50% (95%CI 0.80-16.79) and 5.85% (95%CI 0.44-11.55), respectively. PM 10 could also be associated with increased admissions in the dry season, but high correlation between PM 10 and NO 2 (0.78) limits our ability to distinguish between PM 10 and NO 2 effects. In the rainy season (May-October), negative associations between pollutants and admissions were observed. Results of this first study of the health effects of air pollution in HCMC support the presence of an association between combustion-source pollution and increased ALRI admissions. ALRI admissions were generally positively associated with ambient levels of PM 10, NO 2, and SO 2 during the dry season, but not the rainy season. Negative results in the rainy season could be driven by residual confounding present from May to October. Preliminary exploratory analyses suggested that seasonal differences in the prevalence of viral causes of ALRI could be driving the observed differences in effects by season. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAir Quality, Atmosphere and Healthen_US
dc.subjectAir Pollutionen_US
dc.subjectAlrien_US
dc.subjectChildren's Healthen_US
dc.subjectVietnamen_US
dc.titleAir pollution and admissions for acute lower respiratory infections in young children of Ho Chi Minh Cityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThach, TQ:thach@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TQ=rp00450en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11869-011-0158-zen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84874365521en_US
dc.identifier.spage167en_US
dc.identifier.epage179en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000315357800015-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMehta, S=7401670339en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgo, LH=35269375600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Dzung, D=48862346800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCohen, A=35224633800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThach, TQ=6602850066en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDan, VX=48861104100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTuan, ND=48862255200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGiang, LT=6602143015en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9770256-

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