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Article: Alcohol consumption and aortic arch calcification in an older Chinese sample: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleAlcohol consumption and aortic arch calcification in an older Chinese sample: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
KeywordsAlcohol
Aortic Arch Calcification
Atherosclerosis
Chinese
Older People
Issue Date2013
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijcard
Citation
International Journal Of Cardiology, 2013, v. 164 n. 3, p. 349-354 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To examine the association between alcohol consumption and aortic arch calcification (AAC) in an older Chinese sample. Methods: In 27,844 older people aged 50-85, socioeconomic position and lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire. The presence and severity of AAC were diagnosed from chest X-ray by two experienced radiologists. Results: In men, the risk for AAC increased significantly in frequent or excessive drinkers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.36 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.59) and 1.49 (1.21-1.83) for those who drank >5 times/week and those who drank excessively, respectively] (P for trend from 0.002 to 0.001). When AAC was analyzed as an outcome variable with 3 categories of severity, significant dose-response relations between the severity of AAC and alcohol consumption were observed, with those who drank frequently (> 5/week) or excessively having more serious AAC (P for trend = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). No significant association was found in women as few drank excessively. Conclusion: The presence and severity of AAC were associated with quantity or frequency of alcohol consumption in a dose-response pattern, suggesting that alcohol drinking, even when moderate, has no benefit for AAC. Excessive drinking increased the risk of AAC by 50% compared to never drinkers. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151747
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 4.036
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.151
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:48Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Cardiology, 2013, v. 164 n. 3, p. 349-354en_US
dc.identifier.issn0167-5273en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151747-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine the association between alcohol consumption and aortic arch calcification (AAC) in an older Chinese sample. Methods: In 27,844 older people aged 50-85, socioeconomic position and lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire. The presence and severity of AAC were diagnosed from chest X-ray by two experienced radiologists. Results: In men, the risk for AAC increased significantly in frequent or excessive drinkers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.36 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.59) and 1.49 (1.21-1.83) for those who drank >5 times/week and those who drank excessively, respectively] (P for trend from 0.002 to 0.001). When AAC was analyzed as an outcome variable with 3 categories of severity, significant dose-response relations between the severity of AAC and alcohol consumption were observed, with those who drank frequently (> 5/week) or excessively having more serious AAC (P for trend = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). No significant association was found in women as few drank excessively. Conclusion: The presence and severity of AAC were associated with quantity or frequency of alcohol consumption in a dose-response pattern, suggesting that alcohol drinking, even when moderate, has no benefit for AAC. Excessive drinking increased the risk of AAC by 50% compared to never drinkers. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijcarden_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Cardiologyen_US
dc.subjectAlcoholen_US
dc.subjectAortic Arch Calcificationen_US
dc.subjectAtherosclerosisen_US
dc.subjectChineseen_US
dc.subjectOlder Peopleen_US
dc.titleAlcohol consumption and aortic arch calcification in an older Chinese sample: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJiang, CQ: cqjiang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailXu, L: linxu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailThomas, GN: neilt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, WS: zhangws9@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, KK: chengkk@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijcard.2011.07.046en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21813196-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84884211989en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214092-
dc.identifier.volume164-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage349-
dc.identifier.epage354-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316599700024-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, L=35180837300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=35180743500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_US

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