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Article: Age-specificity of clinical dengue during primary and secondary infections

TitleAge-specificity of clinical dengue during primary and secondary infections
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosntds.org
Citation
Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2011, v. 5 n. 6 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: This study aims to estimate the age-specific risks of clinical dengue attack (i.e., the risk of symptomatic dengue among the total number of dengue virus (DENV) infections) during primary and secondary infections. Methods: We analyzed two pieces of epidemiological information in Binh Thuan province, southern Vietnam, i.e., age-specific seroprevalence and a community-wide longitudinal study of clinical dengue attack. The latter data set stratified febrile patients with DENV infection by age as well as infection parity. A simple modeling approach was employed to estimate the age-specific risks of clinical dengue attack during primary and secondary infections. Results: Using the seroprevalence data, the force of infection was estimated to be 11.7% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 10.8-12.7) per year. Median age (and the 25-75 percentiles) of dengue fever patients during primary and secondary infections were 12 (9-20) and 20 (14-31) years, respectively. The estimated age-specific risk of clinical dengue increases as a function of age for both primary and secondary infections; the estimated proportion of symptomatic patients among the total number of infected individuals was estimated to be <7% for those aged <10 years for both primary and secondary infections, but increased as patients become older, reaching to 8-11% by the age of 20 years. Conclusions/Significance: For both primary and secondary infections, higher age at DENV infection was shown to result in higher risk of clinical attack. Age as an important modulator of clinical dengue explains recent increase in dengue notifications in ageing countries in Southeast Asia, and moreover, poses a paradoxical problem of an increase in adult patients resulting from a decline in the force of infection, which may be caused by various factors including time-dependent variations in epidemiological, ecological and demographic dynamics. © 2011 Thai et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151746
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 4.716
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.362
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Netherlands Foundation for the Advancement of Tropical Research (WOTRO)
Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)
Japan Science and Technology Agency
Funding Information:

This study was supported by a grant from the Netherlands Foundation for the Advancement of Tropical Research (WOTRO). K. T. D. Thai is supported by a 'Mosaic' fellowship from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). H. Nishiura is supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency PRESTO program. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThai, KTDen_US
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoang, PLen_US
dc.contributor.authorTran, NTTen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhan, GTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLe, HQen_US
dc.contributor.authorTran, BQen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Nguyen, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Vries, PJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPlos Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2011, v. 5 n. 6en_US
dc.identifier.issn1935-2727en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151746-
dc.description.abstractBackground: This study aims to estimate the age-specific risks of clinical dengue attack (i.e., the risk of symptomatic dengue among the total number of dengue virus (DENV) infections) during primary and secondary infections. Methods: We analyzed two pieces of epidemiological information in Binh Thuan province, southern Vietnam, i.e., age-specific seroprevalence and a community-wide longitudinal study of clinical dengue attack. The latter data set stratified febrile patients with DENV infection by age as well as infection parity. A simple modeling approach was employed to estimate the age-specific risks of clinical dengue attack during primary and secondary infections. Results: Using the seroprevalence data, the force of infection was estimated to be 11.7% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 10.8-12.7) per year. Median age (and the 25-75 percentiles) of dengue fever patients during primary and secondary infections were 12 (9-20) and 20 (14-31) years, respectively. The estimated age-specific risk of clinical dengue increases as a function of age for both primary and secondary infections; the estimated proportion of symptomatic patients among the total number of infected individuals was estimated to be <7% for those aged <10 years for both primary and secondary infections, but increased as patients become older, reaching to 8-11% by the age of 20 years. Conclusions/Significance: For both primary and secondary infections, higher age at DENV infection was shown to result in higher risk of clinical attack. Age as an important modulator of clinical dengue explains recent increase in dengue notifications in ageing countries in Southeast Asia, and moreover, poses a paradoxical problem of an increase in adult patients resulting from a decline in the force of infection, which may be caused by various factors including time-dependent variations in epidemiological, ecological and demographic dynamics. © 2011 Thai et al.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosntds.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen_US
dc.titleAge-specificity of clinical dengue during primary and secondary infectionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H:nishiura@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0001180en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959852480en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959852480&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292139600022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThai, KTD=8401117500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNishiura, H=7005501836en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoang, PL=47761113500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTran, NTT=47761565300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPhan, GT=55175235800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLe, HQ=12785457500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTran, BQ=36341594700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Nguyen, N=23010473700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridde Vries, PJ=7102207519en_US

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