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Article: Lung function and exposure to workplace second-hand smoke during exemptions from smoking ban legislation: An exposure - Response relationship based on indoor PM 2.5 and urinary cotinine levels

TitleLung function and exposure to workplace second-hand smoke during exemptions from smoking ban legislation: An exposure - Response relationship based on indoor PM 2.5 and urinary cotinine levels
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Thorax, 2011, v. 66 n. 7, p. 615-623 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The effects of workplace second-hand smoke (SHS) on lung function remain uncertain because of a lack of objective measures for SHS exposures. Objective: To determine whether an exposure - response association exists between lung function and two different markers of SHS based on indoor fine particulate (PM 2.5) and urinary cotinine levels in non-smoking catering workers. Design: A cross-sectional study during a 1.5-year exemption of licensed catering premises from smokefree legislation. Participants: 186 non-smoking catering workers aged 18-65 years in Hong Kong were recruited. A declared non-smoking status was accepted in workers with exhaled breath carbon monoxide levels <6 ppm and urinary cotinine levels <100 ng/ml. Main outcome measures: Lung function measures of forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV 1 in litres), forced vital capacity (FVC in litres) and forced expiratory flow as 25-75% of FVC (FEF 25-75 in l/s) were recorded. Results: Indoor fine particulate (PM 2.5) concentrations were 4.4 times as high in smoking premises (267.9 μg/m 3) than in non-smoking premises (60.3 mg/m3) and were strongly associated with the probability of permitted smoking (R 2=0.99). Smoking was the dominant source of particulates (R 2=0.66). Compared with workers exposed to the lowest indoor PM 2.5 stratum (<25 μg/m 3), lung function was lower in the three higher PM 2.5 strata (25-75, 75-175, >175 μg/m 3) with FEV 1 -0.072 (95% CI -0.123 to -0.021), -0.078 (95% CI -0.132 to -0.024), -0.101 (95% CI -0.187 to -0.014); FEF 25-75 -0.368 (95% CI -0.660 to -0.077), -0.489 (95% CI -0.799 to -0.179), -0.597 (95% CI -0.943 to -0.251); and FEV 1/FVC (%) -2.9 (95% CI -4.8 to -1.0), -3.2 (95% CI -5.1 to -1.4) and -4.4 (95% CI -7.4 to -1.3), respectively. Urinary cotinine was associated positively with indoor PM 2.5 but negatively with lung function. Consistently lower values for lung function per unit increase of indoor PM 2.5 were found. Conclusion: Lung function is inversely associated with workplace SHS. Workplace exemptions and delays in implementing smoke-free policies and current moves to relax legislation are a major threat to the health of workers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151744
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.121
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.650
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health and Health Services Research Fund of the Hong Kong SAR government (HHSRF)05060661
Funding Information:

AJH received funding for this study from the Health and Health Services Research Fund of the Hong Kong SAR government (HHSRF#05060661).

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorRepace, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, QYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcghee, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThorax, 2011, v. 66 n. 7, p. 615-623en_US
dc.identifier.issn0040-6376en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151744-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The effects of workplace second-hand smoke (SHS) on lung function remain uncertain because of a lack of objective measures for SHS exposures. Objective: To determine whether an exposure - response association exists between lung function and two different markers of SHS based on indoor fine particulate (PM 2.5) and urinary cotinine levels in non-smoking catering workers. Design: A cross-sectional study during a 1.5-year exemption of licensed catering premises from smokefree legislation. Participants: 186 non-smoking catering workers aged 18-65 years in Hong Kong were recruited. A declared non-smoking status was accepted in workers with exhaled breath carbon monoxide levels <6 ppm and urinary cotinine levels <100 ng/ml. Main outcome measures: Lung function measures of forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV 1 in litres), forced vital capacity (FVC in litres) and forced expiratory flow as 25-75% of FVC (FEF 25-75 in l/s) were recorded. Results: Indoor fine particulate (PM 2.5) concentrations were 4.4 times as high in smoking premises (267.9 μg/m 3) than in non-smoking premises (60.3 mg/m3) and were strongly associated with the probability of permitted smoking (R 2=0.99). Smoking was the dominant source of particulates (R 2=0.66). Compared with workers exposed to the lowest indoor PM 2.5 stratum (<25 μg/m 3), lung function was lower in the three higher PM 2.5 strata (25-75, 75-175, >175 μg/m 3) with FEV 1 -0.072 (95% CI -0.123 to -0.021), -0.078 (95% CI -0.132 to -0.024), -0.101 (95% CI -0.187 to -0.014); FEF 25-75 -0.368 (95% CI -0.660 to -0.077), -0.489 (95% CI -0.799 to -0.179), -0.597 (95% CI -0.943 to -0.251); and FEV 1/FVC (%) -2.9 (95% CI -4.8 to -1.0), -3.2 (95% CI -5.1 to -1.4) and -4.4 (95% CI -7.4 to -1.3), respectively. Urinary cotinine was associated positively with indoor PM 2.5 but negatively with lung function. Consistently lower values for lung function per unit increase of indoor PM 2.5 were found. Conclusion: Lung function is inversely associated with workplace SHS. Workplace exemptions and delays in implementing smoke-free policies and current moves to relax legislation are a major threat to the health of workers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofThoraxen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants, Occupational - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution, Indoor - Adverse Effects - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshCotinine - Urineen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFood Handlingen_US
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volume - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLung - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOccupational Exposure - Adverse Effects - Analysis - Legislation & Jurisprudenceen_US
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshRestaurants - Legislation & Jurisprudenceen_US
dc.subject.meshSmoking - Legislation & Jurisprudence - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - Adverse Effects - Analysis - Legislation & Jurisprudenceen_US
dc.subject.meshVital Capacity - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleLung function and exposure to workplace second-hand smoke during exemptions from smoking ban legislation: An exposure - Response relationship based on indoor PM 2.5 and urinary cotinine levelsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, HK:laihk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGhee, SM:smmcghee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, HK=rp01527en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGhee, SM=rp00393en_US
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/thx.2011.160291en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21551212-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959313892en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros187480-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959313892&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume66en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage615en_US
dc.identifier.epage623en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1468-3296-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291680300013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.projectRisks from passive smoking by workers in the catering industry-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, HK=11739685900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRepace, J=18038118700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, C=7102919981en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, QY=49961778300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGhee, SM=7003288588en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_US

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