File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Does childhood meat eating contribute to sex differences in risk factors for ischaemic heart disease in a developing population?

TitleDoes childhood meat eating contribute to sex differences in risk factors for ischaemic heart disease in a developing population?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2011, v. 65 n. 6, p. 522-528 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: A male epidemic of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) emerges with economic development. It has previously been hypothesised that this epidemic is due to nutritionally driven levels of pubertal sex steroids, which lead to a more atherogenic body shape and lipid profile in boys but not girls, without any sex-specific effects on glucose metabolism. This study tests this hypothesis by examining the association of childhood meat eating with IHD risk in a developing Chinese population. Methods: Multivariable linear and censored regression was used in a cross-sectional study of 19 418 Chinese older ($50 years) men and women from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (phases 2 and 3) to assess the adjusted associations of childhood meat eating with waist to hip ratio (WHR), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fasting plasma glucose. Results: Adjusted for age, childhood hunger, life-course socioeconomic position and current lifestyle childhood almost daily meat eating compared with less than weekly meat eating was associated with higher WHR (0.007, 95% CI 0.0003 to 0.01) in men but not women. No association with fasting glucose was observed. Conclusions: Given the potential limitations of this study, especially the crude nature of the exposure and modest findings, the results should be considered as preliminary. However, they do lend support to the hypothesis that the male epidemic of premature IHD and sexual divergence in IHD rates that occur with economic development may be nutritionally driven in childhood. In elucidating the developmental origins of noncommunicable chronic diseases, more attention should be focused on the sociohistorical context and the role of puberty.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151739
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

This work was supported by the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong; the University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China; and the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, the decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHeys, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 2011, v. 65 n. 6, p. 522-528en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151739-
dc.description.abstractBackground: A male epidemic of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) emerges with economic development. It has previously been hypothesised that this epidemic is due to nutritionally driven levels of pubertal sex steroids, which lead to a more atherogenic body shape and lipid profile in boys but not girls, without any sex-specific effects on glucose metabolism. This study tests this hypothesis by examining the association of childhood meat eating with IHD risk in a developing Chinese population. Methods: Multivariable linear and censored regression was used in a cross-sectional study of 19 418 Chinese older ($50 years) men and women from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (phases 2 and 3) to assess the adjusted associations of childhood meat eating with waist to hip ratio (WHR), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and fasting plasma glucose. Results: Adjusted for age, childhood hunger, life-course socioeconomic position and current lifestyle childhood almost daily meat eating compared with less than weekly meat eating was associated with higher WHR (0.007, 95% CI 0.0003 to 0.01) in men but not women. No association with fasting glucose was observed. Conclusions: Given the potential limitations of this study, especially the crude nature of the exposure and modest findings, the results should be considered as preliminary. However, they do lend support to the hypothesis that the male epidemic of premature IHD and sexual divergence in IHD rates that occur with economic development may be nutritionally driven in childhood. In elucidating the developmental origins of noncommunicable chronic diseases, more attention should be focused on the sociohistorical context and the role of puberty.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshChild Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDiet - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshEconomic Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMeat - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Ischemia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.titleDoes childhood meat eating contribute to sex differences in risk factors for ischaemic heart disease in a developing population?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHeys, M: m_heys@lycos.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHeys, M=rp00257en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech.2009.099143en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20584727-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956226964en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros185518-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79956226964&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume65en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage522en_HK
dc.identifier.epage528en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290209400010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHeys, M=22234232400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, C=10639500500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, W=14833531400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats