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Article: Childhood meat eating and inflammatory markers: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleChildhood meat eating and inflammatory markers: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
KeywordsCardiovascular Disease
Childhood Nutrition
China
Developing Country
Inflammation
Sex
White Blood Cell Count
Issue Date2011
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
BMC Public Health, 2011, v. 11, article no. 345 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: We hypothesized that socio-economic development could, via nutritionally driven levels of pubertal sex-steroids, promote a pro-inflammatory state among men but not women in developing countries. We tested this hypothesis, using recalled childhood meat eating as a proxy for childhood nutrition, in southern China. Methods. We used multivariable linear regression in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study phase 3 (2006-8) to examine the adjusted associations of recalled childhood meat eating, <1/week (n = 5,023), about once per week (n = 3,592) and almost daily (n = 1,252), with white blood cell count and its differentials among older (50 years) men (n = 2,498) and women (n = 7,369). Results: Adjusted for age, childhood socio-economic position, education and smoking, childhood meat eating had sex-specific associations with white blood cell count and lymphocyte count, but not granulocyte count. Men with childhood meat eating almost daily compared to <1/week had higher white blood cell count (0.33 10 9/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10 to 0.56) and higher lymphocyte count (0.16 10 9/L, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.25). Adjustment for obesity slightly attenuated these associations. Conclusion: If confirmed, this hypothesis implies that economic development and the associated improvements in nutrition at puberty may be less beneficial among men than women; consistent with the widening sex differentials in life expectancy with economic development. © 2011 Schooling et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151738
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.209
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.372
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong
Guangzhou Public Health Bureau
Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
Funding Information:

The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study investigators include: Guangzhou No. 12 Hospital: WS Zhang, M Cao, T Zhu, B Liu, CQ Jiang (Co-PI); The University of Hong Kong: CM Schooling, SM McGhee, GM Leung, R Fielding, TH Lam (Co-PI); The University of Birmingham: P Adab, GN Thomas, KK Cheng (Co-PI). This work was supported by the University of Hong Kong Foundation for Development and Research, Hong Kong; The University of Hong Kong University Research Committee Strategic Research Theme Public Health, Hong Kong; Guangzhou Public Health Bureau, and Guangzhou Science and Technology Committee, Guangzhou, China; and The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2011, v. 11, article no. 345en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151738-
dc.description.abstractBackground: We hypothesized that socio-economic development could, via nutritionally driven levels of pubertal sex-steroids, promote a pro-inflammatory state among men but not women in developing countries. We tested this hypothesis, using recalled childhood meat eating as a proxy for childhood nutrition, in southern China. Methods. We used multivariable linear regression in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study phase 3 (2006-8) to examine the adjusted associations of recalled childhood meat eating, <1/week (n = 5,023), about once per week (n = 3,592) and almost daily (n = 1,252), with white blood cell count and its differentials among older (50 years) men (n = 2,498) and women (n = 7,369). Results: Adjusted for age, childhood socio-economic position, education and smoking, childhood meat eating had sex-specific associations with white blood cell count and lymphocyte count, but not granulocyte count. Men with childhood meat eating almost daily compared to <1/week had higher white blood cell count (0.33 10 9/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10 to 0.56) and higher lymphocyte count (0.16 10 9/L, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.25). Adjustment for obesity slightly attenuated these associations. Conclusion: If confirmed, this hypothesis implies that economic development and the associated improvements in nutrition at puberty may be less beneficial among men than women; consistent with the widening sex differentials in life expectancy with economic development. © 2011 Schooling et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectChildhood Nutritionen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping Countryen_US
dc.subjectInflammationen_US
dc.subjectSexen_US
dc.subjectWhite Blood Cell Counten_US
dc.titleChildhood meat eating and inflammatory markers: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-11-345en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21595911-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3121633-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956016806en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros199601-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79956016806&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291974700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=24464616400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=36986607900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_US

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