File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Part 4. Interaction between air pollution and respiratory viruses: time-series study of daily mortality and hospital admissions in Hong Kong.

TitlePart 4. Interaction between air pollution and respiratory viruses: time-series study of daily mortality and hospital admissions in Hong Kong.
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Research Report (Health Effects Institute), 2010 n. 154, p. 283-362 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Populations in Asia are not only at risk of harm to their health through environmental degradation as a result of worsening pollution problems but also constantly threatened by recurring and emerging influenza epidemics and. pandemics. Situated in the area with the world's fastest growing economy and close to hypothetical epicenters of influenza transmission, Hong Kong offers a special opportunity for testing environmental management and public health surveillance in the region. In the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA*) project, the Hong Kong research team assessed the health effects of air pollution and influenza as well as the interaction between them. The team also assessed disparities in the health effects of air pollution between relatively deprived and more affluent areas in Hong Kong. The aim was to provide answers to outstanding research questions relating to the short-term effects of air pollution on mortality and hospital admissions; the health effects of influenza with a view to validating different measures of influenza activity according to virologic data; the confounding effects of influenza on estimates of the health effects of air pollution; the modifying effects of influenza on the health effects of air pollution; and the modifying effects of neighborhood social deprivation on the health effects of air pollution. DATA: Data on mortality and hospital admissions for all natural causes, as well as the subcategories of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and respiratory diseases (RD), were derived from the Hong Kong Census and Statistics Department and the Hospital Authority. Daily concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 pm (PM10); and ozone (O3) were derived from eight monitoring stations with hourly data that were at least 75% complete during the study period. Three measures of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity were derived from positive isolates of specimens in the virology laboratory of Queen Mary Hospital (QMH), the main clinical teaching center at The University of Hong Kong and part of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority network of teaching hospitals: influenza intensity (defined as the weekly proportion of positive isolates of influenza in the total number of specimens received for diagnostic tests); the presence of influenza epidemic (defined as a period when the weekly frequency of these positive isolates is > or = 4% of the annual total number of positive isolates [i.e., twice the expected mean value] in two or more consecutive weeks); and influenza predominance (defined as a period of influenza epidemic when the weekly frequency of RSV was less than 2% for two or more consecutive weeks).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151735
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.910

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, PYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, EKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, RYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOu, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, TWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHEI Health Review Committeeen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:40Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationResearch Report (Health Effects Institute), 2010 n. 154, p. 283-362en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1041-5505en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151735-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Populations in Asia are not only at risk of harm to their health through environmental degradation as a result of worsening pollution problems but also constantly threatened by recurring and emerging influenza epidemics and. pandemics. Situated in the area with the world's fastest growing economy and close to hypothetical epicenters of influenza transmission, Hong Kong offers a special opportunity for testing environmental management and public health surveillance in the region. In the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA*) project, the Hong Kong research team assessed the health effects of air pollution and influenza as well as the interaction between them. The team also assessed disparities in the health effects of air pollution between relatively deprived and more affluent areas in Hong Kong. The aim was to provide answers to outstanding research questions relating to the short-term effects of air pollution on mortality and hospital admissions; the health effects of influenza with a view to validating different measures of influenza activity according to virologic data; the confounding effects of influenza on estimates of the health effects of air pollution; the modifying effects of influenza on the health effects of air pollution; and the modifying effects of neighborhood social deprivation on the health effects of air pollution. DATA: Data on mortality and hospital admissions for all natural causes, as well as the subcategories of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and respiratory diseases (RD), were derived from the Hong Kong Census and Statistics Department and the Hospital Authority. Daily concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 pm (PM10); and ozone (O3) were derived from eight monitoring stations with hourly data that were at least 75% complete during the study period. Three measures of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity were derived from positive isolates of specimens in the virology laboratory of Queen Mary Hospital (QMH), the main clinical teaching center at The University of Hong Kong and part of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority network of teaching hospitals: influenza intensity (defined as the weekly proportion of positive isolates of influenza in the total number of specimens received for diagnostic tests); the presence of influenza epidemic (defined as a period when the weekly frequency of these positive isolates is > or = 4% of the annual total number of positive isolates [i.e., twice the expected mean value] in two or more consecutive weeks); and influenza predominance (defined as a period of influenza epidemic when the weekly frequency of RSV was less than 2% for two or more consecutive weeks).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofResearch report (Health Effects Institute)en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - Epidemiology - Mortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNitrogen Dioxide - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshOzone - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Admission - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - Epidemiology - Mortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infections - Chemically Induced - Mortality - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSulfur Dioxide - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titlePart 4. Interaction between air pollution and respiratory viruses: time-series study of daily mortality and hospital admissions in Hong Kong.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM: hrmrwcm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailThach, TQ: thach@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JS: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TQ=rp00450en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JS=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid21446214-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79954500382en_HK
dc.identifier.issue154en_HK
dc.identifier.spage283en_HK
dc.identifier.epage362en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThach, TQ=6602850066en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, PY=34876162600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EK=37088158500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, RY=23988568600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOu, CQ=14070561800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, L=7406279703en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JS=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=37088754400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, TW=7403531744en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHEI Health Review Committee=36173814300en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats