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Article: Part 5. Public health and air pollution in Asia (PAPA): a combined analysis of four studies of air pollution and mortality.

TitlePart 5. Public health and air pollution in Asia (PAPA): a combined analysis of four studies of air pollution and mortality.
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
Research Report (Health Effects Institute), 2010 n. 154, p. 377-418 How to Cite?
AbstractIn recent years, Asia has experienced rapid economic growth and a deteriorating environment caused by the increasing use of fossil fuels. Although the deleterious effects of air pollution from fossil-fuel combustion have been demonstrated in many Western nations, few comparable studies have been conducted in Asia. Time-series studies of daily mortality in Asian cities can contribute important new information to the existing body of knowledge about air pollution and health. Not only can these studies verify important health effects of air pollution in local regions in Asia, they can also help determine the relevance of existing air pollution studies to mortality and morbidity for policymaking and environmental controls. In addition, the studies can help identify factors that might modify associations between air pollution and health effects in various populations and environmental conditions. Collaborative multicity studies in Asia-especially when designed, conducted, and analyzed using a common protocol-will provide more robust air pollution effect estimates for the region as well as relevant, supportable estimates of local adverse health effects needed by environmental and public-health policymakers. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA*) project, sponsored by the Health Effects Institute, consisted of four studies designed to assess the effects of air pollution on mortality in four large Asian cities, namely Bangkok, in Thailand, and Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan, in China. In the PAPA project, a Common Protocol was developed based on methods developed and tested in NMMAPS, APHEA, and time-series studies in the literature to help ensure that the four studies could be compared with each other and with previous studies by following an established protocol. The Common Protocol (found at the end of this volume) is a set of prescriptive instructions developed for the studies and used by the investigators in each city. It is flexible enough to allow for adjustments in methods to optimize the fit of health-effects models to each city's data set. It provides the basis for generating reproducible results in each city and for meta-estimates from combined data. By establishing a common methodology, factors that might influence the differences in results from previous studies can more easily be explored. Administrative support was provided to ensure that the highest quality data were used in the analysis. It is anticipated that the PAPA results will contribute to the international scientific discussion of how to conduct and interpret time-series studies of air pollution and will stimulate the development of high-quality routine systems for recording daily deaths and hospital admissions for time-series analysis. Mortality data were retrieved from routine databases with underlying causes of death coded using the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision or 10th revision (ICD-9, ICD-10). Air quality measurements included nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microm (PM10), and ozone (O3) and were obtained from several fixed-site air monitoring stations that were located throughout the metropolitan areas of the four cities and that met the standards of procedures for quality assurance and quality control carried out by local government units in each city.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151734
ISSN
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.561

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVichitVadakan, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVajanapoom, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOstro, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorThach, TQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, PYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, EKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, RYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorOu, CQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, TWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKan, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLondon, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSong, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorQian, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHe, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, HMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKong, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBentley, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDan, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGong, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQin, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHEI Health Review Committeeen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationResearch Report (Health Effects Institute), 2010 n. 154, p. 377-418en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1041-5505en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151734-
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, Asia has experienced rapid economic growth and a deteriorating environment caused by the increasing use of fossil fuels. Although the deleterious effects of air pollution from fossil-fuel combustion have been demonstrated in many Western nations, few comparable studies have been conducted in Asia. Time-series studies of daily mortality in Asian cities can contribute important new information to the existing body of knowledge about air pollution and health. Not only can these studies verify important health effects of air pollution in local regions in Asia, they can also help determine the relevance of existing air pollution studies to mortality and morbidity for policymaking and environmental controls. In addition, the studies can help identify factors that might modify associations between air pollution and health effects in various populations and environmental conditions. Collaborative multicity studies in Asia-especially when designed, conducted, and analyzed using a common protocol-will provide more robust air pollution effect estimates for the region as well as relevant, supportable estimates of local adverse health effects needed by environmental and public-health policymakers. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA*) project, sponsored by the Health Effects Institute, consisted of four studies designed to assess the effects of air pollution on mortality in four large Asian cities, namely Bangkok, in Thailand, and Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan, in China. In the PAPA project, a Common Protocol was developed based on methods developed and tested in NMMAPS, APHEA, and time-series studies in the literature to help ensure that the four studies could be compared with each other and with previous studies by following an established protocol. The Common Protocol (found at the end of this volume) is a set of prescriptive instructions developed for the studies and used by the investigators in each city. It is flexible enough to allow for adjustments in methods to optimize the fit of health-effects models to each city's data set. It provides the basis for generating reproducible results in each city and for meta-estimates from combined data. By establishing a common methodology, factors that might influence the differences in results from previous studies can more easily be explored. Administrative support was provided to ensure that the highest quality data were used in the analysis. It is anticipated that the PAPA results will contribute to the international scientific discussion of how to conduct and interpret time-series studies of air pollution and will stimulate the development of high-quality routine systems for recording daily deaths and hospital admissions for time-series analysis. Mortality data were retrieved from routine databases with underlying causes of death coded using the World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision or 10th revision (ICD-9, ICD-10). Air quality measurements included nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microm (PM10), and ozone (O3) and were obtained from several fixed-site air monitoring stations that were located throughout the metropolitan areas of the four cities and that met the standards of procedures for quality assurance and quality control carried out by local government units in each city.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofResearch report (Health Effects Institute)en_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshAsia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - Chemically Induced - Mortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNitrogen Dioxide - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshOzone - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Diseases - Chemically Induced - Mortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshSulfur Dioxide - Analysis - Toxicityen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titlePart 5. Public health and air pollution in Asia (PAPA): a combined analysis of four studies of air pollution and mortality.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailThach, TQ: thach@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JS: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityThach, TQ=rp00450en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JS=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid21446215en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79954480400en_HK
dc.identifier.issue154en_HK
dc.identifier.spage377en_HK
dc.identifier.epage418en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=37089643600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVichitVadakan, N=35727944300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVajanapoom, N=6507617527en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOstro, B=7003571962en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThach, TQ=6602850066en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, PY=34876162600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EK=37088158500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, RY=23988568600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOu, CQ=14070561800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, L=7406279703en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JS=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, GN=35465269900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, TW=7403531744en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKan, H=7101602991en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, B=7408608413en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, N=7101663080en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLondon, SJ=7102236521en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSong, G=15924424000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, G=37088273000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Y=37089928600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, L=37000900000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, Z=35727771800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Q=17344029400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, HM=7405572723en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKong, L=17343900200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, D=14059164000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, S=36018369600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, Z=37090087000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiao, D=55423997000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, W=37088795000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBentley, CM=7006295009en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDan, J=22633380500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, B=37089567500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, N=17344800900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, S=24082108200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGong, J=35344935100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, H=23006672000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, H=37089511700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQin, Z=55437406500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHEI Health Review Committee=36173814300en_HK

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