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Article: Determinants of Infant Growth: Evidence from Hong Kong's " Children of 1997" Birth Cohort

TitleDeterminants of Infant Growth: Evidence from Hong Kong's " Children of 1997" Birth Cohort
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Growth
Hong Kong
Infant
Issue Date2010
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidem
Citation
Annals Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 20 n. 11, p. 827-835 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: A high rate of infant growth may be associated with adult cardiovascular disease. We investigated factors associated with infant weight growth in a large sample from the recently transitioned population of Hong Kong. Methods: We used a nonlinear shape invariant model with random effects among 5949 term, singletons (77% follow-up) from a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort " Children of 1997" to investigate factors associated with weight growth in the first year of life. Results: Overall birth weight was lower but infant growth was more rapid than the 2006 WHO standards. Shorter gestation and lower birth order were associated with lower birth weight and faster infant growth. Female sex, maternal smoking in pregnancy, and a mother born in Hong Kong were associated with lower birth weight, but not with faster growth. Higher maternal education was associated with faster infant growth, grades 10-11 (1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.05), greater than or equal to grade12 (1.07, CI = 1.04-1.09) compared with less than or equal to grade 9. Conclusions: Infant growth may respond more rapidly to socio-economic development than birth weight. Whether mother's education is associated with rapid infant growth via current conditions or her own " constitution" is unclear, nevertheless we believe this study illustrates the importance of contextually specific research for understanding the determinants of population health. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151723
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.335
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.439
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong Health Care and Promotion Fund Committee, Hong Kong216106
Health and Health Services Research Fund, Hong Kong03040711
05060671
Funding Information:

We thank the children and families who participated in the study. We also thank the Family Health Service, Department of Health, Government of the Hong Kong SAR, China for its collaboration and cooperation during the data collection. This work was supported by Hong Kong Health Care and Promotion Fund Committee, Hong Kong (grant 216106) and Health and Health Services Research Fund, Hong Kong (grants 03040711 and 05060671)

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:08Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Epidemiology, 2010, v. 20 n. 11, p. 827-835en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1047-2797en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151723-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: A high rate of infant growth may be associated with adult cardiovascular disease. We investigated factors associated with infant weight growth in a large sample from the recently transitioned population of Hong Kong. Methods: We used a nonlinear shape invariant model with random effects among 5949 term, singletons (77% follow-up) from a population-representative Hong Kong Chinese birth cohort " Children of 1997" to investigate factors associated with weight growth in the first year of life. Results: Overall birth weight was lower but infant growth was more rapid than the 2006 WHO standards. Shorter gestation and lower birth order were associated with lower birth weight and faster infant growth. Female sex, maternal smoking in pregnancy, and a mother born in Hong Kong were associated with lower birth weight, but not with faster growth. Higher maternal education was associated with faster infant growth, grades 10-11 (1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.05), greater than or equal to grade12 (1.07, CI = 1.04-1.09) compared with less than or equal to grade 9. Conclusions: Infant growth may respond more rapidly to socio-economic development than birth weight. Whether mother's education is associated with rapid infant growth via current conditions or her own " constitution" is unclear, nevertheless we believe this study illustrates the importance of contextually specific research for understanding the determinants of population health. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/annepidemen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectGrowthen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInfant Welfareen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaternal Welfareen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Statisticalen_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshNonlinear Dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Valuesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf-Assessmenten_US
dc.titleDeterminants of Infant Growth: Evidence from Hong Kong's " Children of 1997" Birth Cohorten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.07.001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20797875-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957682823en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros183416-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957682823&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage827en_HK
dc.identifier.epage835en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283679300005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7817720-

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