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Article: Body-mass index and cancer mortality in the Asia-Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration: Pooled analyses of 424 519 participants

TitleBody-mass index and cancer mortality in the Asia-Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration: Pooled analyses of 424 519 participants
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe Lancet Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/j.lancetoncol
Citation
The Lancet Oncology, 2010, v. 11 n. 8, p. 741-752 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Excess bodyweight is an established risk factor for several types of cancer, but there are sparse data from Asian populations, where the proportion of overweight and obese individuals is increasing rapidly and adiposity can be substantially greater for the same body-mass index (BMI) compared with people from Western populations. Methods: We examined associations of adult BMI with cancer mortality (overall and for 20 cancer sites) in geographic populations from Asia and from Australia and New Zealand (ANZ), within the Asia-Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration, by use of Cox regression analysis. Pooled data from 39 cohorts (recruitment 1961-99, median follow-up 4 years) were analysed for 424 519 participants (77% Asian; 41% female; mean recruitment age 48 years) with individual data on BMI. Findings: After excluding those with follow-up of less than 3 years, 4872 cancer deaths occurred in 401 215 participants. Hazard ratios for cancer sites with increased mortality risk in obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) compared with normal weight participants (BMI 18·5-24·9 kg/m2) were: 1·21 (95% CI 1·09-1·36) for all-cause cancer (excluding lung and upper aerodigestive tract), 1·50 (1·13-1·99) for colon, 1·68 (1·06-2·67) for rectum, 1·63 (1·13-2·35) for breast in women 60 years or older, 2·62 (1·57-4·37) for ovary, 4·21 (1·89-9·39) for cervix, 1·45 (0·97-2·19) for prostate, and 1·66 (1·03-2·68) for leukaemia (all after left censoring at 3 years). The increased risk associated with a 5-unit increase in BMI for those with BMI of 18·5 kg/m2 or higher was 1·09 (95% CI 1·04-1·14) for all cancers (excluding lung and upper aerodigestive tract). There was little evidence of regional differences in relative risk of cancer with higher BMI, apart from cancers of the oropharynx and larynx, where the association was inverse in ANZ and absent in Asia. Interpretation: Overweight and obese individuals in populations across the Asia-Pacific region have a significantly increased risk of mortality from cancer. Strategies to prevent individuals from becoming overweight and obese in Asia are needed to reduce the burden of cancer that is expected if the obesity epidemic continues. Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, Health Research Council of New Zealand, and Pfizer Inc. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151719
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 26.509
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 13.940
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Norwegian Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation via the Norwegian Cancer Society
UK Wellcome Trust
Seoul City Research and Business Development Program10526
New South Wales and Heart Foundation
Funding Information:

CLP was supported by the Norwegian Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation via the Norwegian Cancer Society, GDB was supported by the UK Wellcome Trust, SHJ was supported by Seoul City Research and Business Development Program (10526), and RRH was supported by a New South Wales and Heart Foundation Career Development Award All personal funding sources are unrelated to funding of the APCSC study This paper is dedicated to the memory of our colleague, Professor Konrad Jamrozik, who died on March 23, 2010

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorParr, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorBatty, GDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarzi, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, SCen_US
dc.contributor.authorJee, SHen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnsaryMoghaddam, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorJamrozik, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorUeshima, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHuxley, RRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:07Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Lancet Oncology, 2010, v. 11 n. 8, p. 741-752en_US
dc.identifier.issn1470-2045en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151719-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Excess bodyweight is an established risk factor for several types of cancer, but there are sparse data from Asian populations, where the proportion of overweight and obese individuals is increasing rapidly and adiposity can be substantially greater for the same body-mass index (BMI) compared with people from Western populations. Methods: We examined associations of adult BMI with cancer mortality (overall and for 20 cancer sites) in geographic populations from Asia and from Australia and New Zealand (ANZ), within the Asia-Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration, by use of Cox regression analysis. Pooled data from 39 cohorts (recruitment 1961-99, median follow-up 4 years) were analysed for 424 519 participants (77% Asian; 41% female; mean recruitment age 48 years) with individual data on BMI. Findings: After excluding those with follow-up of less than 3 years, 4872 cancer deaths occurred in 401 215 participants. Hazard ratios for cancer sites with increased mortality risk in obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) compared with normal weight participants (BMI 18·5-24·9 kg/m2) were: 1·21 (95% CI 1·09-1·36) for all-cause cancer (excluding lung and upper aerodigestive tract), 1·50 (1·13-1·99) for colon, 1·68 (1·06-2·67) for rectum, 1·63 (1·13-2·35) for breast in women 60 years or older, 2·62 (1·57-4·37) for ovary, 4·21 (1·89-9·39) for cervix, 1·45 (0·97-2·19) for prostate, and 1·66 (1·03-2·68) for leukaemia (all after left censoring at 3 years). The increased risk associated with a 5-unit increase in BMI for those with BMI of 18·5 kg/m2 or higher was 1·09 (95% CI 1·04-1·14) for all cancers (excluding lung and upper aerodigestive tract). There was little evidence of regional differences in relative risk of cancer with higher BMI, apart from cancers of the oropharynx and larynx, where the association was inverse in ANZ and absent in Asia. Interpretation: Overweight and obese individuals in populations across the Asia-Pacific region have a significantly increased risk of mortality from cancer. Strategies to prevent individuals from becoming overweight and obese in Asia are needed to reduce the burden of cancer that is expected if the obesity epidemic continues. Funding: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, Health Research Council of New Zealand, and Pfizer Inc. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Lancet Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/j.lancetoncolen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Lancet Oncologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshAsia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshAustralia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - Ethnology - Mortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshNew Zealand - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Ethnology - Mortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshOverweight - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen_US
dc.titleBody-mass index and cancer mortality in the Asia-Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration: Pooled analyses of 424 519 participantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1470-2045(10)70141-8en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20594911-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955267574en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros177043-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955267574&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage741en_US
dc.identifier.epage752en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281009500020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridParr, CL=12809214300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBatty, GD=7003988354en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarzi, F=7003545543en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, X=7401433023en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SC=7403716908en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJee, SH=16039275900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAnsaryMoghaddam, A=8608489600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJamrozik, K=26426193300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridUeshima, H=7005129002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoodward, M=7102510958en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuxley, RR=6701828350en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7404215-

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