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Article: Psychological distress among adolescents in Chengdu, Sichuan at 1 month after the 2008 Sichuan earthquake

TitlePsychological distress among adolescents in Chengdu, Sichuan at 1 month after the 2008 Sichuan earthquake
Authors
KeywordsDepression
Disaster
Earthquake
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1099-3460
Citation
Journal Of Urban Health, 2010, v. 87 n. 3, p. 504-523 How to Cite?
AbstractA devastating earthquake occurred on May 12, 2008 in Sichuan, China. This study investigated the prevalence and factors in association with psychological problems among secondary school students living in Chengdu (90 km away from the disaster epicenter) in June 2008. In a cross-sectional survey, 3,324 secondary students self-administered a structured questionnaire in classroom setting. Validated scales were used in this study. Among all respondents, 22.3% reported post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); 22.6% were probable depression cases; 10.6% reported suicidal ideation; and 14.1% would like to receive psychological counseling. No gender differences were found. While social/emotional support from teachers or peers (OR from 0.40 to 0.78) and exposure to positive news reports (OR from 0.59 to 0.62) were found protective, prior experience of severe mental distress (OR from 1.60 to 2.68) and corporal punishment (OR from 1.31 to 1.58), worry about future aftershocks (OR from 1.64 to 3.11), absence from school when it was not closed (OR from 1.38 to 1.48), exposures to scary or sorrowful disaster media coverage (OR from 1.39 to 2.07), post-disaster visits to affected sites (OR from 1.51 to 1.59), separation from parents (OR = 1.61), etc., were risk factors predictive of some of the aforementioned psychological problems. Negative mental health impacts were prevalent among the respondents. Teachers, parents, and the mass media are all important in maintaining good mental health among adolescents that are indirectly affected by the severe earthquake. The results have important implications for earthquake preparedness and relief work in the future. © 2010 The New York Academy of Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151717
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.046
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.244
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, JTFen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, WWSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, KCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLui, WWSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, EYYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:27:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:27:04Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Urban Health, 2010, v. 87 n. 3, p. 504-523en_US
dc.identifier.issn1099-3460en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151717-
dc.description.abstractA devastating earthquake occurred on May 12, 2008 in Sichuan, China. This study investigated the prevalence and factors in association with psychological problems among secondary school students living in Chengdu (90 km away from the disaster epicenter) in June 2008. In a cross-sectional survey, 3,324 secondary students self-administered a structured questionnaire in classroom setting. Validated scales were used in this study. Among all respondents, 22.3% reported post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); 22.6% were probable depression cases; 10.6% reported suicidal ideation; and 14.1% would like to receive psychological counseling. No gender differences were found. While social/emotional support from teachers or peers (OR from 0.40 to 0.78) and exposure to positive news reports (OR from 0.59 to 0.62) were found protective, prior experience of severe mental distress (OR from 1.60 to 2.68) and corporal punishment (OR from 1.31 to 1.58), worry about future aftershocks (OR from 1.64 to 3.11), absence from school when it was not closed (OR from 1.38 to 1.48), exposures to scary or sorrowful disaster media coverage (OR from 1.39 to 2.07), post-disaster visits to affected sites (OR from 1.51 to 1.59), separation from parents (OR = 1.61), etc., were risk factors predictive of some of the aforementioned psychological problems. Negative mental health impacts were prevalent among the respondents. Teachers, parents, and the mass media are all important in maintaining good mental health among adolescents that are indirectly affected by the severe earthquake. The results have important implications for earthquake preparedness and relief work in the future. © 2010 The New York Academy of Medicine.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal is located at http://www.springerlink.com/content/1099-3460-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Healthen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectDisasteren_US
dc.subjectEarthquakeen_US
dc.subjectPost-Traumatic Stress Disorderen_US
dc.titlePsychological distress among adolescents in Chengdu, Sichuan at 1 month after the 2008 Sichuan earthquakeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYu, X:yuxn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYu, X=rp01405en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11524-010-9447-3en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77954686951en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros179557-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77954686951&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume87en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage504en_US
dc.identifier.epage523en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000277716000014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, JTF=26643560600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, X=25927714000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=36093596400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, WWS=14058714900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoi, KC=10739412900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, WWS=36093089900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, EYY=16681853700en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike7082005-

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