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Article: Distinct ethnic differences in lipid profiles across glucose categories

TitleDistinct ethnic differences in lipid profiles across glucose categories
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2010, v. 95 n. 4, p. 1793-1801 How to Cite?
AbstractContext: Dyslipidemia coexists with hyperglycemia. However, little is known about the ethnic differences in lipid profiles at comparable glucose tolerance status. Objective: The aim was to study ethnic differences in lipid profiles stratified by glucose levels. Design and Setting: Data from 31 study cohorts of 12 countries, consisting of 24,760 men and 27,595 women aged 25-74 yr, were compared. The odds ratio for having dyslipidemia was estimated for each ethnic group stratified by glucose categories. Results: Compared with central and northern Europeans, multivariable adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for having lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were 4.74 (4.19-5.37), 5.05 (3.88-6.56), 3.07 (2.15-4.40), and 2.37 (1.67-3.35) in Asian Indian men, but 0.12 (0.09-0.16), 0.07 (0.04-0.13), 0.11 (0.07-0.20), and 0.16 (0.08-0.32) in Chinese men who had normoglycemia, prediabetes, and undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes, respectively. Similar results were obtained for women. The prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol remained higher in Asian Indians (62.8% of the nondiabetic and 67.4% of the diabetic) than in central and northern Europeans (20.3 and 37.3%), Japanese (25.7 and 34.1%), or Qingdao Chinese (15.7 and 17.0%), even in individuals with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol of less than 3 mmol/liter. Conclusion: There are distinct patterns of lipid profiles associated with ethnicity regardless of the glucose levels, suggesting that ethnic-specific strategies and guidelines on risk assessment and prevention of cardiovascular disease are required. Copyright © 2010 by The Endocrine Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151707
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.940
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Academy of Finland118492
Funding Information:

The current data analysis has been carried out with the help of grants from the Academy of Finland (118492).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorQiao, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorTuomilehto, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorJanus, EDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamachandran, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMohan, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorStehouwer, CDAen_US
dc.contributor.authorDong, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorNakagami, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorOnat, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSöderberg, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:26:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:26:52Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2010, v. 95 n. 4, p. 1793-1801en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-972Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151707-
dc.description.abstractContext: Dyslipidemia coexists with hyperglycemia. However, little is known about the ethnic differences in lipid profiles at comparable glucose tolerance status. Objective: The aim was to study ethnic differences in lipid profiles stratified by glucose levels. Design and Setting: Data from 31 study cohorts of 12 countries, consisting of 24,760 men and 27,595 women aged 25-74 yr, were compared. The odds ratio for having dyslipidemia was estimated for each ethnic group stratified by glucose categories. Results: Compared with central and northern Europeans, multivariable adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for having lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol were 4.74 (4.19-5.37), 5.05 (3.88-6.56), 3.07 (2.15-4.40), and 2.37 (1.67-3.35) in Asian Indian men, but 0.12 (0.09-0.16), 0.07 (0.04-0.13), 0.11 (0.07-0.20), and 0.16 (0.08-0.32) in Chinese men who had normoglycemia, prediabetes, and undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes, respectively. Similar results were obtained for women. The prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol remained higher in Asian Indians (62.8% of the nondiabetic and 67.4% of the diabetic) than in central and northern Europeans (20.3 and 37.3%), Japanese (25.7 and 34.1%), or Qingdao Chinese (15.7 and 17.0%), even in individuals with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol of less than 3 mmol/liter. Conclusion: There are distinct patterns of lipid profiles associated with ethnicity regardless of the glucose levels, suggesting that ethnic-specific strategies and guidelines on risk assessment and prevention of cardiovascular disease are required. Copyright © 2010 by The Endocrine Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Endocrine Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcem.endojournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAsia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshEthnic Groups - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshEurope - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGlucose Tolerance Testen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLipids - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshLipoproteins - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Characteristicsen_US
dc.titleDistinct ethnic differences in lipid profiles across glucose categoriesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.2009-2348en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20118302en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951643788en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros170720-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951643788&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume95en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage1793en_US
dc.identifier.epage1801en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000276402300038-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, L=8386441900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiao, Q=7005824706en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTuomilehto, J=36012823000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanus, ED=7006936536en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRamachandran, A=7102252827en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMohan, V=35509595400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStehouwer, CDA=36051195700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDong, Y=14033817800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNakagami, T=7006023112en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOnat, A=7005036119en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSöderberg, S=35463005200en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6613522-

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