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Article: Changes in condom use behaviours among clients of female sex workers in China

TitleChanges in condom use behaviours among clients of female sex workers in China
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://sti.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2009, v. 85 n. 5, p. 376-382 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Clients of female sex workers (CFSWs) are at risk for HIV transmission; relevant surveillance and interventions for this vulnerable group are scarce. The China-UK HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care Project launched an enhanced intervention programme involving peer education, seminars, testing services and social gatherings and so forth, and two behavioural surveillance studies (BSS) targeting CFSWs in Suining, Sichuan. Methods: Two cross-sectional BSS (a baseline survey and an evaluative survey) were conducted in September 2005 and May 2006, respectively. In total, 356 and 372 respondents who patronised some low-end sex services were interviewed by peer interviewers. Another triangulation condom audit exercise was conducted in June 2006. Results: Prevalence of respondents using at least one prevention service increased from 50.3% in 2005 to 68.5% in 2006 (AOR=2.2). Respondents of the evaluative survey compared with their counterparts of the baseline survey had lower prevalence of inconsistent condom users in the last 6 months (44.1% vs 77.0%; AOR=0.2) and higher prevalence of condom use in the last episode of commercial sex (78.0% vs 41.5%; AOR=4.9). The triangulation audit showed that condoms were used by 73.8% of CFSWs. The multivariate analysis shows that year of study (OR=0.3), self-reported sexually transmitted disease symptoms (OR=2.9), use of face-to-face counselling services (OR=0.5) and so forth were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use during commercial sex in the last 6 months. Conclusions: Condom use and service use behaviours changed in the study population over a time period when an enhanced intervention programme was implemented. Such effective programmes may be applied to other locations in China.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151683
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.015
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.142
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
UK's Department for International Development and Family Health International
Funding Information:

This study was supported by the UK's Department for International Development and Family Health International (China-UK HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care Project).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, JTFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, XNen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:26:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:26:36Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationSexually Transmitted Infections, 2009, v. 85 n. 5, p. 376-382en_US
dc.identifier.issn1368-4973en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151683-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Clients of female sex workers (CFSWs) are at risk for HIV transmission; relevant surveillance and interventions for this vulnerable group are scarce. The China-UK HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care Project launched an enhanced intervention programme involving peer education, seminars, testing services and social gatherings and so forth, and two behavioural surveillance studies (BSS) targeting CFSWs in Suining, Sichuan. Methods: Two cross-sectional BSS (a baseline survey and an evaluative survey) were conducted in September 2005 and May 2006, respectively. In total, 356 and 372 respondents who patronised some low-end sex services were interviewed by peer interviewers. Another triangulation condom audit exercise was conducted in June 2006. Results: Prevalence of respondents using at least one prevention service increased from 50.3% in 2005 to 68.5% in 2006 (AOR=2.2). Respondents of the evaluative survey compared with their counterparts of the baseline survey had lower prevalence of inconsistent condom users in the last 6 months (44.1% vs 77.0%; AOR=0.2) and higher prevalence of condom use in the last episode of commercial sex (78.0% vs 41.5%; AOR=4.9). The triangulation audit showed that condoms were used by 73.8% of CFSWs. The multivariate analysis shows that year of study (OR=0.3), self-reported sexually transmitted disease symptoms (OR=2.9), use of face-to-face counselling services (OR=0.5) and so forth were significantly associated with inconsistent condom use during commercial sex in the last 6 months. Conclusions: Condom use and service use behaviours changed in the study population over a time period when an enhanced intervention programme was implemented. Such effective programmes may be applied to other locations in China.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://sti.bmjjournals.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSexually Transmitted Infectionsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCondoms - Utilizationen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHiv Infections - Prevention & Control - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshProstitution - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk-Takingen_US
dc.subject.meshSafe Sex - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshSexual Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshSexual Partners - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshUnsafe Sex - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleChanges in condom use behaviours among clients of female sex workers in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYu, XN:yuxn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYu, XN=rp01405en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/sti.2008.035162en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19497919-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349306577en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349306577&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume85en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage376en_US
dc.identifier.epage382en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000270082500014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, JTF=26643560600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, SP=35197190800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, XN=25927714000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, F=35754407500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, Y=7601310826en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, N=35270747000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, L=18234294100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=36093596400en_US

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