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Article: Adolescents' experience of comments about their weight: prevalence, accuracy and effects on weight misperception

TitleAdolescents' experience of comments about their weight: prevalence, accuracy and effects on weight misperception
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/
Citation
BMC Public Health, 2009, v. 9, article no. 271 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Weight comments are commonly received by adolescents, but the accuracy of the comments and their effects on weight misperception are unclear. We assessed the prevalence and accuracy of weight comments received by Chinese adolescents from different sources and their relation to weight misperception. METHODS: In the Hong Kong Student Obesity Surveillance (HKSOS) project 2006-07, 22612 students aged 11-18 (41.5% boys) completed a questionnaire on obesity. Students responded if family members, peers and professionals had seriously commented over the past 30 days that they were 'too fat' or 'too thin' in two separate questions. The accuracy of the comments was judged against the actual weight status derived from self-reported height and weight. Self-perceived weight status was also reported and any discordance with the actual weight status denoted weight misperception. Logistic regression yielded adjusted odd ratios for weight misperception by the type of weight comments received. RESULTS: One in three students received weight comments, and the mother was the most common source of weight comments. Health professional was the most accurate source of weight comments, yet less than half the comments were correct. Adolescents receiving incorrect comments had increased risk of having weight misperception in all weight status groups. Receiving conflicting comments was positively associated with weight misperception among normal weight adolescents. In contrast, underweight and overweight/obese adolescents receiving correct weight comments were less likely to have weight misperception. CONCLUSION: Weight comments, mostly incorrect, were commonly received by Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong, and such incorrect comments were associated with weight misperception.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151680
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.209
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.372
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University Research Committee, Strategic Research Theme on Public Health, The University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The study was supported by the University Research Committee, Strategic Research Theme on Public Health, The University of Hong Kong. We would like to thank the schools and students for their participation.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:26:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:26:33Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health, 2009, v. 9, article no. 271en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151680-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Weight comments are commonly received by adolescents, but the accuracy of the comments and their effects on weight misperception are unclear. We assessed the prevalence and accuracy of weight comments received by Chinese adolescents from different sources and their relation to weight misperception. METHODS: In the Hong Kong Student Obesity Surveillance (HKSOS) project 2006-07, 22612 students aged 11-18 (41.5% boys) completed a questionnaire on obesity. Students responded if family members, peers and professionals had seriously commented over the past 30 days that they were 'too fat' or 'too thin' in two separate questions. The accuracy of the comments was judged against the actual weight status derived from self-reported height and weight. Self-perceived weight status was also reported and any discordance with the actual weight status denoted weight misperception. Logistic regression yielded adjusted odd ratios for weight misperception by the type of weight comments received. RESULTS: One in three students received weight comments, and the mother was the most common source of weight comments. Health professional was the most accurate source of weight comments, yet less than half the comments were correct. Adolescents receiving incorrect comments had increased risk of having weight misperception in all weight status groups. Receiving conflicting comments was positively associated with weight misperception among normal weight adolescents. In contrast, underweight and overweight/obese adolescents receiving correct weight comments were less likely to have weight misperception. CONCLUSION: Weight comments, mostly incorrect, were commonly received by Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong, and such incorrect comments were associated with weight misperception.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Public Healthen_US
dc.rightsBMC Public Health. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBody Weighten_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillanceen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.titleAdolescents' experience of comments about their weight: prevalence, accuracy and effects on weight misperceptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, WS: tracia@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMak, KK: kkmak@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLai, YK: anitalai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-9-271en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19642972-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2731749-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69449101101en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros163151-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69449101101&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9, article no. 271en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269664400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, YK=34067687100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KK=19934230600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, WS=16022233800en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5321241-

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