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Article: Adult height and the risks of cardiovascular disease and major causes of death in the Asia-Pacific region: 21 000 deaths in 510 000 men and women
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TitleAdult height and the risks of cardiovascular disease and major causes of death in the Asia-Pacific region: 21 000 deaths in 510 000 men and women
 
AuthorsLee, CMY4
Barzi, F4
Woodward, M1 4
Batty, GD7
Giles, GG5
Wong, JW13
Jamrozik, K9
Lam, TH4
Ueshima, H12
Kim, HC8
Gu, DF11
Schooling, M2
Huxley, RR4
Maegawa, H
Okayama, A
Ueshima, H
Nakamura, M
Aoki, N
Wu, ZS
Yao, CH
Luszcz, M
Welborn, TA10
Tang, Z
Liu, LS3
Xie, JX3
Norton, R
Ameratunga, S
Macmahon, S
Whitlock, G
Knuiman, MW
Christensen, H
Wu, XG
Zhou, J6
Yu, XH6
Tamakoshi, A
Pan, WH
Wu, ZL
Chen, LQ
Shan, GL
Sritara, P
Duan, XF
Whitlock, G
Jackson, R
Li, YH
Jiang, CQ
Kiyohara, Y
Arima, H
Iida, M
Woo, J
Ho, SC
Hong, Z
Huang, MS
Zhou, B
Fuh, JL
Ueshima, H
Kita, Y
Choudhury, SR
Suh, I
Jee, SH
Kim, IS
Hashimoto, T
Sakata, K
Dobson, A
Imai, Y
Ohkubo, T
Hozawa, A
Jamrozik, K
Hobbs, M
Broadhurst, R
Nakachi, K
Fang, XH
Li, SC
Yang, QD
Chen, ZM
Tanaka, H
Nozaki, A
Matsutani, Y
Horibe, H
Kagaya;, M
Hughes, K
Lee, J
Heng, D
Chew, SK
Zhou, BF
Zhang, HY
Shimamoto, K
Saitoh, S
Li, ZZ
Norman, P
He, Y
Lam, TH
Yao, SX
 
Issue Date2009
 
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 2009, v. 38 n. 4, p. 1060-1071 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyp150
 
AbstractBackground: In Caucasian populations, adult height is inversely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and positively related to some cancers. However, there are few data from Asian populations and from women. We sought to determine the sex- and region-specific associations between height and cardiovascular outcomes, and deaths due to cancer, respiratory and injury in populations from the Asia-Pacific region. Methods: Thirty-nine studies from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration database were included. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate the associations between height and pre-specified outcomes. Results: A total of 510 800 participants with 21 623 deaths were included. Amongst men, inverse linear associations were observed between height and coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, CVD, injury and total mortality. The hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals, (CI)] for a 1-SD (= 6 cm) increment in height ranged from 0.85 (0.80-0.91) for injury to 0.97 (0.95-0.98) for total mortality. Similar trends were found between height and CHD, haemorrhagic stroke and CVD in women. A positive linear association was observed between height and cancer mortality. For each standard deviation greater height, the risk of cancer was increased by 5% (2-8%) and 9% (5-14%) in men and women, respectively. No regional difference was observed between Asian and Australasian cohorts. Adjusting for markers of education did not alter the results. Conclusions: The opposing relationships of height with CVD and cancer suggest that care is required in setting national policies on childhood nutrition lest they have unintended consequences on the incidence of major non-communicable diseases. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2009; all rights reserved.
 
ISSN0300-5771
2013 Impact Factor: 9.197
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.074
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyp150
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000268812300026
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia402903
358395
UK Wellcome Trust
Funding Information:

National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (402903 to CMYL, 358395 to APCSC); UK Wellcome Trust (to GDB).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLee, CMY
 
dc.contributor.authorBarzi, F
 
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, M
 
dc.contributor.authorBatty, GD
 
dc.contributor.authorGiles, GG
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, JW
 
dc.contributor.authorJamrozik, K
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorUeshima, H
 
dc.contributor.authorKim, HC
 
dc.contributor.authorGu, DF
 
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, M
 
dc.contributor.authorHuxley, RR
 
dc.contributor.authorMaegawa, H
 
dc.contributor.authorOkayama, A
 
dc.contributor.authorUeshima, H
 
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, M
 
dc.contributor.authorAoki, N
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, ZS
 
dc.contributor.authorYao, CH
 
dc.contributor.authorLuszcz, M
 
dc.contributor.authorWelborn, TA
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, LS
 
dc.contributor.authorXie, JX
 
dc.contributor.authorNorton, R
 
dc.contributor.authorAmeratunga, S
 
dc.contributor.authorMacmahon, S
 
dc.contributor.authorWhitlock, G
 
dc.contributor.authorKnuiman, MW
 
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, XG
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, J
 
dc.contributor.authorYu, XH
 
dc.contributor.authorTamakoshi, A
 
dc.contributor.authorPan, WH
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, ZL
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, LQ
 
dc.contributor.authorShan, GL
 
dc.contributor.authorSritara, P
 
dc.contributor.authorDuan, XF
 
dc.contributor.authorWhitlock, G
 
dc.contributor.authorJackson, R
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, YH
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ
 
dc.contributor.authorKiyohara, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorArima, H
 
dc.contributor.authorIida, M
 
dc.contributor.authorWoo, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, SC
 
dc.contributor.authorHong, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, MS
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, B
 
dc.contributor.authorFuh, JL
 
dc.contributor.authorUeshima, H
 
dc.contributor.authorKita, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorChoudhury, SR
 
dc.contributor.authorSuh, I
 
dc.contributor.authorJee, SH
 
dc.contributor.authorKim, IS
 
dc.contributor.authorHashimoto, T
 
dc.contributor.authorSakata, K
 
dc.contributor.authorDobson, A
 
dc.contributor.authorImai, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorOhkubo, T
 
dc.contributor.authorHozawa, A
 
dc.contributor.authorJamrozik, K
 
dc.contributor.authorHobbs, M
 
dc.contributor.authorBroadhurst, R
 
dc.contributor.authorNakachi, K
 
dc.contributor.authorFang, XH
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, SC
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, QD
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, ZM
 
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, H
 
dc.contributor.authorNozaki, A
 
dc.contributor.authorMatsutani, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorHoribe, H
 
dc.contributor.authorKagaya;, M
 
dc.contributor.authorHughes, K
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, J
 
dc.contributor.authorHeng, D
 
dc.contributor.authorChew, SK
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, BF
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, HY
 
dc.contributor.authorShimamoto, K
 
dc.contributor.authorSaitoh, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, ZZ
 
dc.contributor.authorNorman, P
 
dc.contributor.authorHe, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH
 
dc.contributor.authorYao, SX
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:26:31Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:26:31Z
 
dc.date.issued2009
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: In Caucasian populations, adult height is inversely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and positively related to some cancers. However, there are few data from Asian populations and from women. We sought to determine the sex- and region-specific associations between height and cardiovascular outcomes, and deaths due to cancer, respiratory and injury in populations from the Asia-Pacific region. Methods: Thirty-nine studies from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration database were included. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate the associations between height and pre-specified outcomes. Results: A total of 510 800 participants with 21 623 deaths were included. Amongst men, inverse linear associations were observed between height and coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, CVD, injury and total mortality. The hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals, (CI)] for a 1-SD (= 6 cm) increment in height ranged from 0.85 (0.80-0.91) for injury to 0.97 (0.95-0.98) for total mortality. Similar trends were found between height and CHD, haemorrhagic stroke and CVD in women. A positive linear association was observed between height and cancer mortality. For each standard deviation greater height, the risk of cancer was increased by 5% (2-8%) and 9% (5-14%) in men and women, respectively. No regional difference was observed between Asian and Australasian cohorts. Adjusting for markers of education did not alter the results. Conclusions: The opposing relationships of height with CVD and cancer suggest that care is required in setting national policies on childhood nutrition lest they have unintended consequences on the incidence of major non-communicable diseases. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2009; all rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 2009, v. 38 n. 4, p. 1060-1071 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyp150
 
dc.identifier.citeulike5491113
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyp150
 
dc.identifier.epage1071
 
dc.identifier.hkuros164030
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268812300026
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia402903
358395
UK Wellcome Trust
Funding Information:

National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (402903 to CMYL, 358395 to APCSC); UK Wellcome Trust (to GDB).

 
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771
2013 Impact Factor: 9.197
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.074
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.pmid19270305
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67651237092
 
dc.identifier.spage1060
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151678
 
dc.identifier.volume38
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAge Factors
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAsia - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshAustralia - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshBody Height - Physiology
 
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methods
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms - Mortality
 
dc.subject.meshRespiration Disorders - Mortality
 
dc.subject.meshWounds And Injuries - Mortality
 
dc.titleAdult height and the risks of cardiovascular disease and major causes of death in the Asia-Pacific region: 21 000 deaths in 510 000 men and women
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Barzi, F</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Woodward, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Batty, GD</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Giles, GG</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, JW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Jamrozik, K</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Xie, JX</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Sritara, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Duan, XF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Whitlock, G</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Jackson, R</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, YH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Jiang, CQ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kiyohara, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Arima, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Iida, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Woo, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, SC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hong, Z</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Huang, MS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhou, B</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Fuh, JL</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Kim, IS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Hashimoto, T</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Sakata, K</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Dobson, A</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Imai, Y</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Lee, J</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Heng, D</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chew, SK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhou, BF</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhang, HY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Shimamoto, K</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Saitoh, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, ZZ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Norman, P</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>He, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, TH</contributor.author>
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<date.accessioned>2012-06-26T06:26:31Z</date.accessioned>
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<description.abstract>Background: In Caucasian populations, adult height is inversely associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and positively related to some cancers. However, there are few data from Asian populations and from women. We sought to determine the sex- and region-specific associations between height and cardiovascular outcomes, and deaths due to cancer, respiratory and injury in populations from the Asia-Pacific region. Methods: Thirty-nine studies from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration database were included. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to estimate the associations between height and pre-specified outcomes. Results: A total of 510 800 participants with 21 623 deaths were included. Amongst men, inverse linear associations were observed between height and coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, CVD, injury and total mortality. The hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals, (CI)] for a 1-SD (= 6 cm) increment in height ranged from 0.85 (0.80-0.91) for injury to 0.97 (0.95-0.98) for total mortality. Similar trends were found between height and CHD, haemorrhagic stroke and CVD in women. A positive linear association was observed between height and cancer mortality. For each standard deviation greater height, the risk of cancer was increased by 5% (2-8%) and 9% (5-14%) in men and women, respectively. No regional difference was observed between Asian and Australasian cohorts. Adjusting for markers of education did not alter the results. Conclusions: The opposing relationships of height with CVD and cancer suggest that care is required in setting national policies on childhood nutrition lest they have unintended consequences on the incidence of major non-communicable diseases. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association &#169; The Author 2009; all rights reserved.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The Mount Sinai Medical Center
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Civil Service Workers
  4. University of Sydney
  5. Cancer Council
  6. KMIC
  7. University of Glasgow
  8. Yonsei University College of Medicine
  9. University of Adelaide
  10. Capital Iron and Steel Company
  11. Fuwai Hospital
  12. Shiga University of Medical Science
  13. Chinese University of Hong Kong