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Article: Personal exposures and microenvironment concentrations of PM2.5, VOC, NO2 and CO in Oxford, UK

TitlePersonal exposures and microenvironment concentrations of PM2.5, VOC, NO2 and CO in Oxford, UK
Authors
KeywordsCarbon Monoxide
Elemental Composition
Indoor Concentration
Nitrogen Dioxide
Particulate Matters
Personal Exposure
Volatile Organic Compound
Issue Date2004
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenv
Citation
Atmospheric Environment, 2004, v. 38 n. 37, p. 6399-6410 How to Cite?
AbstractBetween 1998 and 2000 in Oxford, UK, simultaneous personal exposures and microenvironmental measurements (home indoor, home outdoor and work indoor) to fine particulate matters PM2.5, volatile organic compounds (VOC), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were carried out once per person among 50 adults over a 48-h period. Thirty-seven elements in PM 2.5 and 30 different VOCs were analysed. Questionnaires were distributed to record their time-activity patterns and exposure-related information. Results showed that participants spent more time (89.5%) in all indoors than in other microenvironments. Geometric mean (GM) of personal and home indoor levels of PM2.5, 14 elements (aluminium, arsenic, bromine, calcium, copper, iron, gallium, potassium, sodium, phosphorus, lead, selenium, silicon, titanium), total VOC (TVOC) and 8 individual compounds (nonane, decane, undecane, trimethylbenzene, toluene, benzaldehyde, alpha-pinene and d-limonene) were over 20% higher than their GM outdoor levels. Those of NO2, 5 aromatic VOCs (benzene, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, m,p-xylene) and 5 other elements (chlorine, magnesium, manganese, sulphur, zinc) were close to their GM outdoor levels. For PM2.5 and TVOC, personal exposures and residential indoor levels (in GM) were about 2 times higher among the tobacco-smoke exposed group compared to the non-smoke exposed group, suggesting that smoking is an important determinant of these exposures. Determinants for CO were visualised by real-time monitoring, and we showed that the peak levels of personal exposure to CO were associated with smoking, cooking and transportation activities. Moderate to good correlations were only found between the personal exposures and residential indoor levels for both PM 2.5 (r=0.60, p<0.001) and NO2 (r=0.47, p=0.003). © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151667
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.459
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.999
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorFerrier, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLindup, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorAlm, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHänninen, Oen_US
dc.contributor.authorJantunen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorMathys, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorColvile, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorAshmore, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorCullinan, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorNieuwenhuijsen, MJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:26:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:26:19Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Environment, 2004, v. 38 n. 37, p. 6399-6410en_US
dc.identifier.issn1352-2310en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151667-
dc.description.abstractBetween 1998 and 2000 in Oxford, UK, simultaneous personal exposures and microenvironmental measurements (home indoor, home outdoor and work indoor) to fine particulate matters PM2.5, volatile organic compounds (VOC), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were carried out once per person among 50 adults over a 48-h period. Thirty-seven elements in PM 2.5 and 30 different VOCs were analysed. Questionnaires were distributed to record their time-activity patterns and exposure-related information. Results showed that participants spent more time (89.5%) in all indoors than in other microenvironments. Geometric mean (GM) of personal and home indoor levels of PM2.5, 14 elements (aluminium, arsenic, bromine, calcium, copper, iron, gallium, potassium, sodium, phosphorus, lead, selenium, silicon, titanium), total VOC (TVOC) and 8 individual compounds (nonane, decane, undecane, trimethylbenzene, toluene, benzaldehyde, alpha-pinene and d-limonene) were over 20% higher than their GM outdoor levels. Those of NO2, 5 aromatic VOCs (benzene, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene, m,p-xylene) and 5 other elements (chlorine, magnesium, manganese, sulphur, zinc) were close to their GM outdoor levels. For PM2.5 and TVOC, personal exposures and residential indoor levels (in GM) were about 2 times higher among the tobacco-smoke exposed group compared to the non-smoke exposed group, suggesting that smoking is an important determinant of these exposures. Determinants for CO were visualised by real-time monitoring, and we showed that the peak levels of personal exposure to CO were associated with smoking, cooking and transportation activities. Moderate to good correlations were only found between the personal exposures and residential indoor levels for both PM 2.5 (r=0.60, p<0.001) and NO2 (r=0.47, p=0.003). © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenven_US
dc.relation.ispartofAtmospheric Environmenten_US
dc.subjectCarbon Monoxideen_US
dc.subjectElemental Compositionen_US
dc.subjectIndoor Concentrationen_US
dc.subjectNitrogen Dioxideen_US
dc.subjectParticulate Mattersen_US
dc.subjectPersonal Exposureen_US
dc.subjectVolatile Organic Compounden_US
dc.titlePersonal exposures and microenvironment concentrations of PM2.5, VOC, NO2 and CO in Oxford, UKen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, HK:laihk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, HK=rp01527en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atmosenv.2004.07.013en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-6044273731en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-6044273731&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue37en_US
dc.identifier.spage6399en_US
dc.identifier.epage6410en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225167500013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, HK=11739685900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKendall, M=7201638493en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFerrier, H=6506126883en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLindup, I=6506256531en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlm, S=7003438725en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHänninen, O=7102391212en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJantunen, M=26643559000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMathys, P=7003888833en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridColvile, R=7004191948en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAshmore, MR=7006425496en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCullinan, P=7005770363en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNieuwenhuijsen, MJ=7007123042en_US

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