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Article: Early life second-hand smoke exposure and serious infectious morbidity during the first 8 years: Evidence from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohort

TitleEarly life second-hand smoke exposure and serious infectious morbidity during the first 8 years: Evidence from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohort
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://tc.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Tobacco Control, 2008, v. 17 n. 4, p. 263-270 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure is a modifiable cause of ill health. Despite the smoking ban in public places introduced in Hong Kong in 2007, infants and children continue to be exposed within the home. Aims: To determine the critical windows of SHS exposure and the duration of its impact on serious infectious morbidity in the first 8 years of life. Methods: The Hong Kong "Children of 1997" birth cohort is a prospective, population-based study of 8327 children comprising 88% of all births in April and May 1997, of whom 7402 (89%) were followed up until their eighth birthday in 2005. We used multivariable Cox regression to assess the relation between postnatal SHS exposure and risk of first admission to public hospitals (together accounting for >95% total bed-days overall) for respiratory, other and all infections from birth to 8 years of age, for all individuals and for vulnerable subgroups. Results: Overall, household SHS exposure within 3 metres in early life was associated with a higher risk of admission for infectious illness up until 8 years of age (hazard ratio 1.14, 95% Cl 1.00 to 1.31), after adjustment for sex, birthweight, gestational age, feeding method, maternal age, highest parental education and proxies of preferred service sector. The association was strongest in the first 6 months of life (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.83). In vulnerable subgroups such as premature babies, the association held through to 8 years of age (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.72). Infants exposed to SHS in the first 3 months of life were most vulnerable to infectious causes of hospitalisation. Conclusion: Household SHS exposure in early infancy increases severe infectious morbidity requiring hospital admission. Reducing SHS exposure in infants and particularly in more vulnerable infants will lower the bed-days burden due to infectious causes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151659
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.321
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.855
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, MKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, SSLen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcghee, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:26:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:26:16Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationTobacco Control, 2008, v. 17 n. 4, p. 263-270en_US
dc.identifier.issn0964-4563en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151659-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure is a modifiable cause of ill health. Despite the smoking ban in public places introduced in Hong Kong in 2007, infants and children continue to be exposed within the home. Aims: To determine the critical windows of SHS exposure and the duration of its impact on serious infectious morbidity in the first 8 years of life. Methods: The Hong Kong "Children of 1997" birth cohort is a prospective, population-based study of 8327 children comprising 88% of all births in April and May 1997, of whom 7402 (89%) were followed up until their eighth birthday in 2005. We used multivariable Cox regression to assess the relation between postnatal SHS exposure and risk of first admission to public hospitals (together accounting for >95% total bed-days overall) for respiratory, other and all infections from birth to 8 years of age, for all individuals and for vulnerable subgroups. Results: Overall, household SHS exposure within 3 metres in early life was associated with a higher risk of admission for infectious illness up until 8 years of age (hazard ratio 1.14, 95% Cl 1.00 to 1.31), after adjustment for sex, birthweight, gestational age, feeding method, maternal age, highest parental education and proxies of preferred service sector. The association was strongest in the first 6 months of life (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.83). In vulnerable subgroups such as premature babies, the association held through to 8 years of age (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.72). Infants exposed to SHS in the first 3 months of life were most vulnerable to infectious causes of hospitalisation. Conclusion: Household SHS exposure in early infancy increases severe infectious morbidity requiring hospital admission. Reducing SHS exposure in infants and particularly in more vulnerable infants will lower the bed-days burden due to infectious causes.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://tc.bmjjournals.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTobacco Controlen_US
dc.rightsTobacco Control. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshInfection - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaternal Ageen_US
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.titleEarly life second-hand smoke exposure and serious infectious morbidity during the first 8 years: Evidence from Hong Kong's "Children of 1997" birth cohorten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/tc.2007.023887en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18505748-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-49149090434en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros147914-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-49149090434&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage263en_US
dc.identifier.epage270en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257885500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, MK=12806220300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, SSL=23969113700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KH=8623141300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGhee, SM=7003288588en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_US

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