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Article: Life-course origins of social inequalities in metabolic risk in the population of a developing country

TitleLife-course origins of social inequalities in metabolic risk in the population of a developing country
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Epidemiology, 2008, v. 167 n. 4, p. 419-428 How to Cite?
AbstractIn countries that have been industrialized for a long time, but not always elsewhere, low socioeconomic position (SEP) is associated with ischemic heart disease in men. The authors hypothesized that socioeconomic development could, via pubertal sex steroids, promote an atherogenic lipid profile and body shape in men but not in women. Therefore, they examined the associations of SEP with ischemic heart disease risk in a developing-country population. The authors used multivariable regression to examine the associations of SEP with the metabolic syndrome and its components in 9,746 Chinese adults aged ≥50 years from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study, phase 2, recruited in 2005-2006. After adjustment for age, smoking, alcohol use, and physical activity, high SEP at each of three life stages, proxied by parental possessions in childhood, education, and longest held-occupation, was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome in women but not in men. Higher SEP in men was associated with lower pulse pressure and fasting plasma glucose level but also with greater waist circumference and a lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol level. With socioeconomic development, diet-related hormonal changes at puberty may outweigh the usual protective effect of social advantage in men, with corresponding implications for boys currently undergoing the nutrition transition in the developing world. © The Author 2007. Published by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151648
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.036
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:25:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:25:55Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Epidemiology, 2008, v. 167 n. 4, p. 419-428en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151648-
dc.description.abstractIn countries that have been industrialized for a long time, but not always elsewhere, low socioeconomic position (SEP) is associated with ischemic heart disease in men. The authors hypothesized that socioeconomic development could, via pubertal sex steroids, promote an atherogenic lipid profile and body shape in men but not in women. Therefore, they examined the associations of SEP with ischemic heart disease risk in a developing-country population. The authors used multivariable regression to examine the associations of SEP with the metabolic syndrome and its components in 9,746 Chinese adults aged ≥50 years from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study, phase 2, recruited in 2005-2006. After adjustment for age, smoking, alcohol use, and physical activity, high SEP at each of three life stages, proxied by parental possessions in childhood, education, and longest held-occupation, was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome in women but not in men. Higher SEP in men was associated with lower pulse pressure and fasting plasma glucose level but also with greater waist circumference and a lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol level. With socioeconomic development, diet-related hormonal changes at puberty may outweigh the usual protective effect of social advantage in men, with corresponding implications for boys currently undergoing the nutrition transition in the developing world. © The Author 2007. Published by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, Hdl - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_US
dc.subject.meshDeveloping Countriesen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Syndrome X - Blood - Complications - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Ischemia - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOccupationsen_US
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_US
dc.subject.meshTriglycerides - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshWaist-Hip Ratioen_US
dc.titleLife-course origins of social inequalities in metabolic risk in the population of a developing countryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM:cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwm329en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18056924-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-39349118212en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros140989-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-39349118212&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume167en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage419en_US
dc.identifier.epage428en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1476-6256-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000253246200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchooling, CM=12808565000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJiang, CQ=10639500500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, WS=13410704100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KK=7402997800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_US

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