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Article: Role of ventilation in airborne transmission of infectious agents in the built environment - A multidisciplinary systematic review

TitleRole of ventilation in airborne transmission of infectious agents in the built environment - A multidisciplinary systematic review
Authors
KeywordsAirborne
Airflow
Building
Outbreak
Transmission
Ventilation
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA
Citation
Indoor Air, 2007, v. 17 n. 1, p. 2-18 How to Cite?
AbstractThere have been few recent studies demonstrating a definitive association between the transmission of airborne infections and the ventilation of buildings. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 and current concerns about the risk of an avian influenza (H5N1) pandemic, have made a review of this area timely. We searched the major literature databases between 1960 and 2005, and then screened titles and abstracts, and finally selected 40 original studies based on a set of criteria. We established a review panel comprising medical and engineering experts in the fields of microbiology, medicine, epidemiology, indoor air quality, building ventilation, etc. Most panel members had experience with research into the 2003 SARS epidemic. The panel systematically assessed 40 original studies through both individual assessment and a 2-day face-to-face consensus meeting. Ten of 40 studies reviewed were considered to be conclusive with regard to the association between building ventilation and the transmission of airborne infection. There is strong and sufficient evidence to demonstrate the association between ventilation, air movements in buildings and the transmission/spread of infectious diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, chickenpox, influenza, smallpox and SARS. There is insufficient data to specify and quantify the minimum ventilation requirements in hospitals, schools, offices, homes and isolation rooms in relation to spread of infectious diseases via the airborne route. © 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151637
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.33
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.666
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, JWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChao, CYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, JZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, JWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, PVen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNiu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQian, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSleigh, ACen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSu, HJJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSundell, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, TWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, PLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:25:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:25:50Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIndoor Air, 2007, v. 17 n. 1, p. 2-18en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0905-6947en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151637-
dc.description.abstractThere have been few recent studies demonstrating a definitive association between the transmission of airborne infections and the ventilation of buildings. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 and current concerns about the risk of an avian influenza (H5N1) pandemic, have made a review of this area timely. We searched the major literature databases between 1960 and 2005, and then screened titles and abstracts, and finally selected 40 original studies based on a set of criteria. We established a review panel comprising medical and engineering experts in the fields of microbiology, medicine, epidemiology, indoor air quality, building ventilation, etc. Most panel members had experience with research into the 2003 SARS epidemic. The panel systematically assessed 40 original studies through both individual assessment and a 2-day face-to-face consensus meeting. Ten of 40 studies reviewed were considered to be conclusive with regard to the association between building ventilation and the transmission of airborne infection. There is strong and sufficient evidence to demonstrate the association between ventilation, air movements in buildings and the transmission/spread of infectious diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, chickenpox, influenza, smallpox and SARS. There is insufficient data to specify and quantify the minimum ventilation requirements in hospitals, schools, offices, homes and isolation rooms in relation to spread of infectious diseases via the airborne route. © 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INAen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIndoor Airen_HK
dc.subjectAirborneen_HK
dc.subjectAirflowen_HK
dc.subjectBuildingen_HK
dc.subjectOutbreaken_HK
dc.subjectTransmissionen_HK
dc.subjectVentilationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Microbiology - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshAir Movementsen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Diseases - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshCross Infectionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfection Control - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshVentilation - Standardsen_US
dc.titleRole of ventilation in airborne transmission of infectious agents in the built environment - A multidisciplinary systematic reviewen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:liyg@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0668.2006.00445.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17257148-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846592867en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros134412-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846592867&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2en_HK
dc.identifier.epage18en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243791600001-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=7502094052en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, JW=10341387300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, X=7406504864en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChao, CYH=7403320307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, JZ=24776163200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, JW=36917344400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNielsen, PV=24773772900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNiu, J=7202340911en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, H=36091859600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSleigh, AC=7003585563en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSu, HJJ=7401459683en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSundell, J=7006095411en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, TW=7403531744en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, PL=15836149400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1073201-

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