File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Empirical implications of response acquiescence in discrete-choice contigent valuation

TitleEmpirical implications of response acquiescence in discrete-choice contigent valuation
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749
Citation
Health Economics, 2006, v. 15 n. 10, p. 1077-1089 How to Cite?
AbstractThe use of discrete-choice contingent valuation (CV) to elicit individuals' preference, expressed as maximum willingness-to-pay (WTP), although primarily developed in environmental economics, has been popular in the economic evaluation of health and healthcare. However, a concern with this method is the potential for 'over-estimating' WTP values due to the presence of response acquiescence, or 'yea-saying' bias. Based on a CV survey conducted to estimate physicians' valuation of clinic computerization, the extent of such bias was estimated from a within-sample open-ended valuation question following the respondents' discrete choice response. Analysis of this data suggests that not only was response acquiescence an issue, but also that the parametric estimation of mean and median WTP, the most common approach to estimating WTP from discrete-choice data, would potentially magnify such bias (to various degrees depending on the distributional assumptions applied). The possible extent of CV design versus analysis in discrete-choice methods therefore warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151632
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.151
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.364
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, RYTen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:25:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:25:42Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Economics, 2006, v. 15 n. 10, p. 1077-1089en_US
dc.identifier.issn1057-9230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151632-
dc.description.abstractThe use of discrete-choice contingent valuation (CV) to elicit individuals' preference, expressed as maximum willingness-to-pay (WTP), although primarily developed in environmental economics, has been popular in the economic evaluation of health and healthcare. However, a concern with this method is the potential for 'over-estimating' WTP values due to the presence of response acquiescence, or 'yea-saying' bias. Based on a CV survey conducted to estimate physicians' valuation of clinic computerization, the extent of such bias was estimated from a within-sample open-ended valuation question following the respondents' discrete choice response. Analysis of this data suggests that not only was response acquiescence an issue, but also that the parametric estimation of mean and median WTP, the most common approach to estimating WTP from discrete-choice data, would potentially magnify such bias (to various degrees depending on the distributional assumptions applied). The possible extent of CV design versus analysis in discrete-choice methods therefore warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Economicsen_US
dc.subject.meshChoice Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshEmpirical Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshFinancing, Personalen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Econometricen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance Of Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titleEmpirical implications of response acquiescence in discrete-choice contigent valuationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYeung, RYT: rytyeung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM: jjohnsto@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_US
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hec.1107en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16518835en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33750191599en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros124910-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33750191599&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1077en_US
dc.identifier.epage1089en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241458800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, RYT=7102833306en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, RD=11339094500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats